Article

Cortical tubers, cognition, and epilepsy in tuberous sclerosis.

Comprehensive Epilepsy Program, University of Alberta Hospital, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada.
Pediatric Neurology (Impact Factor: 1.42). 05/2011; 44(5):328-32. DOI: 10.1016/j.pediatrneurol.2011.01.001
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Tuberous sclerosis complex is an autosomal-dominant genetic disorder characterized by hamartomatous growth in various organs. Patients who have this disorder exhibit a high rate of epilepsy and cognitive problems. We investigated number of tubers, location, seizure types, and cognitive outcome, and we analyzed the relationships among them in our tuberous sclerosis patients in the Comprehensive Epilepsy Program at the University of Alberta. We also examined the seizure outcome after tuber resection. Our study cohort included 24 patients with tuberous sclerosis complex. We obtained seizure history, electroencephalogram, and neuropsychologic parameters. Magnetic resonance imaging was used to examine tuber numbers and locations. Ten patients underwent surgical removal of tubers responsible for intractable epilepsy. A negative correlation was found between the number of tubers and intelligent quotient score. Epilepsy surgery led to freedom from seizures in this patient group. We demonstrated that the total number and location of cortical tubers play a significant role in the extent of mental retardation in patients with tuberous sclerosis complex. In addition, patients with intractable seizures and well-defined epileptic focus had excellent surgical outcome.

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