Iloperidone, Asenapine, and Lurasidone: A Brief Overview of 3 New Second-Generation Antipsychotics

New York University School of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry, New York, NY, USA.
Postgraduate Medicine (Impact Factor: 1.7). 03/2011; 123(2):153-62. DOI: 10.3810/pgm.2011.03.2273
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Three new second-generation antipsychotics were approved by the US Food and Drug Administration in 2009 and 2010: iloperidone, asenapine, and lurasidone. All 3 agents are approved for the treatment of acute schizophrenia in adults, and asenapine is also approved for the maintenance treatment of schizophrenia and as a monotherapy or as an adjunct to lithium or valproate for the treatment of bipolar manic or mixed episodes. The expectation is that these new agents will be less problematic regarding treatment-emergent weight gain and metabolic disturbances, which unfortunately can occur with several other second-generation antipsychotics. Asenapine is a sublingual preparation, in contrast to iloperidone and lurasidone, which are swallowed. Iloperidone and asenapine are dosed twice daily, in contrast to lurasidone, which is dosed once daily with food. Both asenapine and lurasidone can be initiated at a dose that is possibly therapeutic, but iloperidone requires 4 days of titration to reach its recommended target dose range. Although both asenapine and lurasidone can be associated with dose-related treatment-emergent akathisia, iloperidone is essentially free of extrapyramidal adverse effects or akathisia throughout its recommended dose range. Sedation and/or somnolence have been reported with each medication. They are the most common adverse events associated with asenapine treatment, and are clearly dose-related for lurasidone. In contrast, no therapeutic dose response for iloperidone, asenapine, or lurasidone is clearly evident from short-term clinical trials. Longer-term and naturalistic studies will be helpful in evaluating these agents and their role in the psychiatric armamentarium.

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Available from: Leslie Citrome, Mar 27, 2015
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    • "Lurasidone is a second-generation atypical antipsychotic that received approval in October 2010 by the United States (US) Food and Drug administration (FDA) for the treatment of adult patients with schizophrenia [24]. Lurasidone can be differentiated from other available second-generation atypical antipsychotics by its receptor binding profile, with moderate affinities for the serotonin 5-HT7, noradrenaline α2c (antagonist), and serotonin 5-HT1A (weak-moderate partial agonist), in addition to the expected high affinity binding for dopamine D2 and serotonin 5-HT2A receptors. "
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    ABSTRACT: Patients with schizophrenia frequently switch between antipsychotics, underscoring the need to achieve and maintain important treatment outcomes such as health-related quality of life (HRQoL) following the switch. This analysis evaluated HRQoL changes among patients with schizophrenia switched from their current antipsychotic to lurasidone. Stable but symptomatic outpatients with schizophrenia were switched from their current antipsychotic to lurasidone in a six-week, open-label trial. HRQoL was assessed using two validated patient-reported measures, the Personal Evaluation of Transitions in Treatment (PETiT) scale and the Short-Form 12 (SF-12). Total and domain scores (psychosocial function and adherence-related attitude) were assessed using the PETiT scale; patients' mental and physical component summary scores (MCS and PCS) were assessed using the SF-12. Changes in HRQoL from baseline to study endpoint were compared using ANCOVA, with baseline score, treatment, and pooled site as covariates. Changes were assessed among all patients and those switched from specific antipsychotics to lurasidone. The analysis included 235 patients with data on the PETiT and SF-12 who had received ≥1 dose of lurasidone. Statistically significant improvements were observed from baseline to study endpoint on the PETiT total (mean change [SD]: 3.2 [8.5]) and psychosocial functioning (2.5 [6.9]) and adherence-related attitude (0.7 [2.6]) domain scores (all p ≤ 0.002). When examined by preswitch antipsychotic, significant improvements in PETiT total scores were observed in patients switched from quetiapine, risperidone, aripiprazole, and ziprasidone (all p < 0.03) but not olanzapine (p = 0.893). Improvements on the SF-12 MCS score were observed for all patients (mean change [SD]: 3.7 [11.5], p < 0.001) and for those switched from quetiapine or aripiprazole (both p < 0.03). The SF-12 PCS scores remained comparable to those at baseline in all patient groups. These findings indicate that patients switching from other antipsychotics to lurasidone experienced statistically significant improvement of HRQoL, based on PETiT scores, within six weeks of treatment. Patient health status remained stable with respect to the SF-12 physical component and showed improvement on the mental component. Changes in HRQoL varied based on the antipsychotic used before switching to lurasidone. NCT01143077.
    BMC Psychiatry 02/2014; 14(1):53. DOI:10.1186/1471-244X-14-53 · 2.21 Impact Factor
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    • "Pooled analyses reported that about 8% of the subjects treated with lurasidone and 4% of the subjects treated with placebo discontinued their treatment prematurely because of adverse events.41 The most common adverse events reported in schizophrenia trials included somnolence, nausea, akathisia, parkinsonism, and sedation.24,42 A few long-term studies also suggested that long-term treatment of lurasidone is well tolerated and safe among schizophrenia populations.39,40 "
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    ABSTRACT: Lurasidone is a benzisothiazol derivative and an atypical antipsychotic approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the acute treatment of adults with schizophrenia (October 2010) and bipolar 1 depression (June 2013). Lurasidone has a strong antagonistic property at the D2, serotonin (5-HT)2A, and 5-HT7 receptors, and partial agonistic property at the 5-HT1A receptor. Lurasidone also has lower binding affinity for the α2C and 5-HT2C receptor. Lurasidone is rapidly absorbed (time to maximum plasma concentration: 1-3 hours), metabolized mainly by CYP3A4 and eliminated by hepatic metabolism. In two large, well-designed, 6-week trials in adult patients with bipolar 1 depression, lurasidone monotherapy and adjunctive therapy with mood stabilizers were significantly more effective than placebo at improving depressive symptoms assessed using the Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale total score. In both trials, lurasidone also reduced the Clinical Global Impression-Bipolar Severity depression score to a greater extent than placebo. In these two trials, discontinuation rates due to adverse events in the lurasidone group were small (<7%) and were not different from those of the placebo group. The most common adverse events in the lurasidone group were headache, nausea, somnolence, and akathisia. The changes in lipid profiles, weight, and parameters of glycemic control were minimal, and these findings were in line with those observed in schizophrenia trials. Further active comparator trials and long-term tolerability and safety data in bipolar patients are required. Lurasidone may be an option for the management of depressive symptoms in patients with bipolar 1 disorder, and it may be considered as a treatment alternative for patients who are at high risk for metabolic abnormalities.
    Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment 10/2013; 9:1521-1529. DOI:10.2147/NDT.S51910 · 1.74 Impact Factor
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    • "In the mind of the clinician, comparisons of asenapine will likely be made against other “metabolically-friendly” second-generation antipsychotics, such as ziprasidone, aripiprazole, iloperidone, and lurasidone.41 Tradeoffs among the choices include issues such as once-daily versus twice-daily dosing, the need for dose titration, special requirements for administration with or without food, as well as specific side effect profiles (see also Table 4 in a paper by the author41 and Table 4 in another paper by the author42). "
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    ABSTRACT: Asenapine tablets are a new option for the treatment of schizophrenia. Sublingual administration is essential because bioavailability if ingested is less than 2%. Efficacy is supported by acute and long-term randomized controlled studies conducted by the manufacturer, with asenapine 5 mg twice daily evidencing superiority over placebo in six-week studies of acute schizophrenia, and flexibly-dosed asenapine (modal dose 10 mg twice daily) superior to placebo in a 26-week maintenance of response study. Tolerability advantages over some second-generation antipsychotics, such as olanzapine, include a relatively favorable weight and metabolic profile, as demonstrated in a 52-week randomized, head-to-head, double-blind clinical trial. Although dose-related extrapyramidal symptoms and akathisia can be present, the frequency of these effects is lower than that for haloperidol and risperidone. Somnolence may also occur, and appears to be somewhat dose-dependent when examining rates of this among patients receiving asenapine for schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. Prolactin elevation can occur, but at a rate lower than that observed for haloperidol or risperidone. Unique to asenapine is the possibility of oral hypoesthesia, occurring in about 5% of participants in the clinical trials. Obstacles to the use of asenapine are the recommendations for twice-daily dosing and the need to avoid food or liquids for 10 minutes after administration, although the bioavailability is only minimally reduced if food or liquids are avoided for only two minutes.
    Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment 05/2011; 7(1):325-39. DOI:10.2147/NDT.S16077 · 1.74 Impact Factor
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