Article

No association between coffee, tea or caffeine consumption and breast cancer risk in a prospective cohort study.

INSERM (Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale), Center for Research in Epidemiology and Population Health (CESP), U1018, 114 rue Edouard Vaillant, F-94805 Villejuif, France.
Public Health Nutrition (Impact Factor: 2.48). 04/2011; 14(7):1315-20. DOI: 10.1017/S1368980011000371
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Numerous mechanisms for the effects of coffee, tea and caffeine on the risk of breast cancer have been suggested. Caffeine intake has already been associated with high plasma levels of female hormones, but associations have not been clearly demonstrated in epidemiological studies.
We examined prospectively the association of coffee, tea and caffeine consumption with breast cancer risk in a French cohort study.
Dietary information was obtained from a 208-item diet history questionnaire self-administered in 1993-1995. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to estimate hazards ratios and 95 % confidence intervals.
The study was conducted on 67 703 women with available dietary information. During a median follow-up of 11 years, 2868 breast cancer cases were diagnosed.
Median intake was 280 ml/d (2·2 cups/d) for coffee and 214 ml/d (1·7 cups/d) for tea. Median caffeine intake was 164 mg/d. No association was found between consumption of coffee, tea or caffeine and breast cancer risk. Sub-analyses by tumour receptor status, menopausal status, type of coffee (regular or decaffeinated) and meals at which beverages were drunk led to the same conclusion.
Results from this prospective study showed no relationship between coffee, tea or caffeine intake and breast cancer risk overall or by hormone receptor status.

0 Followers
 · 
161 Views
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Breast cancer is the second most common cause of death from cancer among women. Lifestyle changes are shown to be important in the prevention of breast cancer. Diet, physical activity, smoking, alcohol use, and vitamin and mineral use are key factors influencing the risk of breast cancer among women. Because these factors are related to each other, it is difficult to assess their individual roles in breast cancer. Some of these factors are alterable, meaning that women can decrease their risk for breast cancer by changing their behavior. Breast cancer is associated with a high rate of mortality and morbidity among women. Therefore, it is logical to try to find ways to decrease the risk of developing breast cancer. Lifestyle changes seem to be an easy, effective, and economical way to help prevention breast cancer. In women with a confirmed breast cancer diagnosis who are under radiotherapy treatment after undergoing a mastectomy, lifestyle changes are still very important. Some factors, such as smoking cessation and prevention of weight gain, may improve the long-term survival chances of these patients. Therefore, ways to increase women's knowledge about the role of lifestyle changes in the prevention of breast cancer and in the survival of patients with diagnosed breast cancer should be considered and studied.
    Electronic Physician 07/2014; 6(3):894-905. DOI:10.14661/2014.894-905
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: IntroductionSpecific coffee subtypes and tea may impact risk of pre- and post-menopausal breast cancer differently. We investigated the association between coffee (total, caffeinated, decaffeinated) and tea intake and risk of breast cancer.MethodsA total of 335,060 women participating in the European Prospective Investigation into Nutrition and Cancer (EPIC) Study, completed a dietary questionnaire from 1992 to 2000, and were followed-up until 2010 for incidence of breast cancer. Hazard ratios (HR) of breast cancer by country-specific, as well as cohort-wide categories of beverage intake were estimated.ResultsDuring an average follow-up of 11 years, 1064 premenopausal, and 9134 postmenopausal breast cancers were diagnosed. Caffeinated coffee intake was associated with lower risk of postmenopausal breast cancer: adjusted HR¿=¿0.90, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.82 to 0.98, for high versus low consumption; P trend¿=¿0.029. While there was no significant effect modification by hormone receptor status (P¿=¿0.711), linear trend for lower risk of breast cancer with increasing caffeinated coffee intake was clearest for estrogen and progesterone receptor negative (ER-PR-), postmenopausal breast cancer (P¿=¿0.008). For every 100 ml increase in caffeinated coffee intake, the risk of ER-PR- breast cancer was lower by 4% (adjusted HR: 0.96, 95% CI: 0.93 to 1.00). Non-consumers of decaffeinated coffee had lower risk of postmenopausal breast cancer (adjusted HR¿=¿0.89; 95% CI: 0.80 to 0.99) compared to low consumers, without evidence of dose¿response relationship (P trend¿=¿0.128). Exclusive decaffeinated coffee consumption was not related to postmenopausal breast cancer risk, compared to any decaffeinated-low caffeinated intake (adjusted HR¿=¿0.97; 95% CI: 0.82 to 1.14), or to no intake of any coffee (HR: 0.96; 95%: 0.82 to 1.14). Caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee were not associated with premenopausal breast cancer. Tea intake was neither associated with pre- nor post-menopausal breast cancer.Conclusions Higher caffeinated coffee intake may be associated with lower risk of postmenopausal breast cancer. Decaffeinated coffee intake does not seem to be associated with breast cancer.
    Breast cancer research: BCR 01/2015; 17(1):15. DOI:10.1186/s13058-015-0521-3 · 5.88 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Some studies suggest a favorable role of antioxidants on breast cancer risk but this is still inconclusive. The aim of this study was to assess whether overall dietary antioxidant capacity, as assessed by dietary ferric reducing antioxidant potential (FRAP), and individual dietary antioxidant intake were associated with breast cancer risk.Data was used from women participating in the Rotterdam Study, a prospective cohort study among subjects aged 55 years and older (N=3209). FRAP scores and antioxidant intake (i.e. vitamin A, C, E, selenium, flavonoids, and carotenoids) was assessed at baseline by a food frequency questionnaire. Incident cases of breast cancer were confirmed through medical reports.During a median follow-up of 17 years, 199 cases with breast cancer were identified. High dietary FRAP score was associated with a lower risk of breast cancer (HR: 0.68; 95% CI: 0.49, 0.96). No overall association between individual antioxidant intake and breast cancer risk was found. However, low intake of alpha carotene and beta carotene was associated with a higher risk of breast cancer among smokers (HR: 2.48; 95% CI: 1.21, 5.12 and HR: 2.31; 95% CI: 1.12, 4.76 for alpha and beta carotene respectively) and low intake of flavonoids was associated with breast cancer risk in women over the age of 70 (HR: 1.80; 95% CI: 1.09, 2.99). These results suggest that high overall dietary antioxidant capacity are associated with a lower risk of breast cancer. Individual effects of dietary carotenoids and dietary flavonoids may be restricted to subgroups such as smokers and elderly. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
    International Journal of Cancer 10/2014; 136(9). DOI:10.1002/ijc.29249 · 5.01 Impact Factor

Preview

Download
0 Downloads