Article

Bioactive antioxidant mixtures promote proliferation and migration on human oral fibroblasts.

Department of Biomedical Sciences, Baylor College of Dentistry, Dallas, TX, USA.
Archives of oral biology (Impact Factor: 1.65). 03/2011; 56(8):812-22. DOI: 10.1016/j.archoralbio.2011.01.001
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Antioxidants (AOs) are the first line of defence against free radical damage and are critical for maintaining optimum health and well being. The need for AOs becomes even more critical with increased exposure to free radicals generated by pollution, cigarette smoke, drugs, illness, stress and exercise. Antioxidant supplementation is an excellent way of improving free radical protection. The aim of this study was to provide cytotoxicity, proliferation and migration data on the in vitro effects of bioactive AO mixtures on human oral fibroblasts.
Human oral fibroblasts were obtained from human gingival (HGF) and periodontal (HPDL) tissues. Each of these oral fibroblasts was cultured separately in three concentrations of the bioactive pure polyphenol and turmeric derivative mixtures; resveratrol (R), ferulic acid (F), phloretin (P) and tetrahydrocurcuminoids (T); [(RFT), (PFR), and (PFT)]. Cell viability, proliferation, morphology and migratory behaviour were analysed in vitro using high throughput in vitro 96 well plate wound assay.
RFT decreased (10(-3)M) and increased (10(-5)M) cell number in HGF cells. Three concentrations (10(-3), 10(-4), and 10(-5)M) of PFR and PFT increased DNA synthesis in HGF cells. PFT promoted cell migration but PFR and RFT had no significant change in HGF wound healing rates in a 96 well plate assay monolayer wound. In the HPDL cells, the 10(-4)M concentration of both RFT and PFT increased cell number at 72 h and 96 h whereas the lower concentration 10(-5)M of RFT significantly stimulated cell number at 96 h. PFR (10(-3)M and 10(-5)M) and PFT (10(-3)M) increased DNA synthesis after 48 h treatment in HPDL cells.
High and low concentrations (10(-3)-10(-5)M) of these AOs (RFT, PFR) may have beneficial effects on functional mechanisms regulating fibroblast migration and proliferation during gingival healing or periodontal repair.

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