Article

Pharmacy students' perceptions of a required senior research project.

School of Pharmacy, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA 94143-0622, USA.
American journal of pharmaceutical education (Impact Factor: 1.19). 12/2010; 74(10):190. DOI: 10.5688/aj7410190
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT To determine pharmacy students' perceptions of a required research project in a doctor of pharmacy curriculum.
A survey instrument was administered to senior pharmacy students to determine their perceptions of the project advisor and overall project experience and their postgraduation employment plans.
Two-hundred twenty-nine (81.5%) students completed a survey instrument. The majority agreed or strongly agreed that the project provided a valuable learning experience (88.2%), provided a competitive advantage for postgraduate job opportunities (73.2%), and should be a continued graduation requirement (74.2%). Respondents with plans for a residency or fellowship were more likely than those entering a community or hospital/institutional pharmacy to agree that completion of the project made them more qualified or marketable and should be continued as a graduation requirement (p < 0.05).
A required research project was perceived by pharmacy students to be a beneficial experience. Students pursuing residency or fellowship were more likely to feel the project was beneficial than students entering the workforce.

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