Article

Case series: Diffusion weighted MRI appearance in prostatic abscess.

Department of Radiodiagnosis, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh, India.
The Indian journal of radiology and imaging 01/2011; 21(1):46-8. DOI: 10.4103/0971-3026.76054
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT DIFFUSION: weighted MRI (DWI) is a novel technique that analyzes the diffusion of water molecules in vivo. DWI has been used extensively in the central nervous system. Its use in body imaging is on the rise. In the prostate, it has been used in the evaluation of prostatic carcinoma. We present DWI findings in two patients of prostatic abscess.

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