Article

Improved growth and anemia in HIV-infected African children taking cotrimoxazole prophylaxis

MRC Clinical Trials Unit, London, United Kingdom.
Clinical Infectious Diseases (Impact Factor: 9.42). 04/2011; 52(7):953-6. DOI: 10.1093/cid/cir029
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT The impact of cotrimoxazole (CTX) on growth and/or anemia was investigated in 541 human immunodeficiency virus-infected, antiretroviral therapy-naive Zambian children enrolled in the Children with HIV Antibiotic Prophylaxis trial. Compared with children randomized to receive placebo, children randomized to receive CTX had slower decreases in weight-for-age (P=.04) and height-for-age (P=.01), and greater increase in hemoglobin level (P=.01). These findings argue for expanded early CTX use.

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