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Light Propagation in Curved Silver Nanowire Plasmonic Waveguides

Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics and Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Box 603-146, 100190, Beijing, China.
Nano Letters (Impact Factor: 13.59). 03/2011; 11(4):1603-8. DOI: 10.1021/nl104514m
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Plasmonic waveguides made of metal nanowires (NWs) possess significant potential for applications in integrated photonic and electronic devices. Energy loss induced by bending of a NW during light propagation is critical in affecting its performance as a plasmonic waveguide. We report the characterization of the pure bending loss in curved crystalline silver NW plasmonic waveguides by decoupling the energy loss caused by bending and propagation. The energy attenuation coefficiency due purely to bending was also determined, which exhibited an exponential relationship with the bending radius. Finite-difference-time-domain (FDTD) methods were utilized for theoretical simulations, which matched the experimental results well.

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