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TRAPping telomerase within the intestinal stem cell niche. EMBO J

Department of Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA.
The EMBO Journal (Impact Factor: 10.75). 03/2011; 30(6):986-7. DOI: 10.1038/emboj.2011.51
Source: PubMed
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