Article

Anti-epileptogenesis in rodent post-traumatic epilepsy models.

Department of Neurobiology, Epilepsy Research Laboratory, A.I. Virtanen Institute for Molecular Sciences, University of Eastern Finland, P.O. Box 1627, FIN-70211 Kuopio, Finland.
Neuroscience Letters (Impact Factor: 2.06). 03/2011; 497(3):163-71. DOI: 10.1016/j.neulet.2011.02.033
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Post-traumatic epilepsy (PTE) accounts for 10-20% of symptomatic epilepsies. The urgency to understand the process of post-traumatic epileptogenesis and search for antiepileptogenic treatments is emphasized by a recent increase in traumatic brain injury (TBI) related to military combat or accidents in the aging population. Recent developments in modeling of PTE in rodents have provided tools for identification of novel drug targets for antiepileptogenesis and biomarkers for predicting the risk of epileptogenesis and treatment efficacy after TBI. Here we review the available data on endophenotypes of humans and rodents with TBI associated with epilepsy. Also, current understanding of the mechanisms and biomarkers for PTE as well as factors associated with preclinical study designs are discussed. Finally, we summarize the attempts to prevent PTE in experimental models.

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