Article

Investing in the future: building an academic hospitalist faculty development program.

Division of Hospital Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California 94143, USA.
Journal of Hospital Medicine (Impact Factor: 2.08). 03/2011; 6(3):161-6. DOI: 10.1002/jhm.845
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Academic hospital medicine (AHM) groups continue to grow rapidly, driven largely by clinical demands. While new hospitalist faculty usually have strong backgrounds in clinical medicine, they often lack the tools needed to achieve excellence in the other aspects of a faculty career, including teaching, research, quality improvement, and leadership skills.
To develop and implement a Faculty Development (FD) Program that improves the knowledge, skills, attitudes, and scholarly output of first-year faculty.
We created a vision and framework for FD that targeted our new faculty but also engaged our entire Division of Hospital Medicine. New faculty participated in a dedicated coaching relationship with a more senior faculty member, a core curriculum, a teaching course, and activities to meet a set of stated scholarly expectations. All faculty participated in newly established divisional Grand Rounds, a lunch seminar series, and venues to share scholarship and works in progress.
Our FD programmatic offerings were rated highly overall on a scale of 1 to 5 (5 highest): Core Seminars 4.83 ± 0.41, Coaching Program 4.5 ± 0.84, Teaching Course 4.5 ± 0.55, Grand Rounds 4.83 ± 0.41, and Lunch Seminars 4.5 ± 0.84. Compared to faculty hired in the 2 years prior to our FD program implementation, new faculty reported greater degrees of work satisfaction, increased comfort with their skills in a variety of areas, and improved academic output.
Building FD programs can be effective to foster the development and satisfaction of new faculty while also creating a shared commitment towards an academic mission.

0 Bookmarks
 · 
115 Views
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Research by hospitalists may aid the evolution of hospital medicine into an academic specialty. To describe the factors associated with research and publication activities among hospitalists and describe trends in hospitalist-led publications. We surveyed members of the Society of Hospital Medicine in June 2012 and conducted univariate analyses on their responses to determine predictors of successful authorship and to describe factors associated with research engagement. We searched PubMed from the database inception to October 2013 for publications with "hospitalist" or "hospital medicine" affiliated authors. Original research articles were reviewed for methodology and funding sources. Of the 645 respondents (5.8% response rate), 277 (43%) had authored peer-reviewed publications, 126 (19%) had access to mentorship, and 68 (11%) reported funding support. There were 213 (33%) who were engaged in research, with the majority conducting quality improvement (QI) research (n = 152, 24%). Completion of a fellowship, pediatrics training, the presence of a mentor, funding, and >25% protected time for research were each individually associated with an increased likelihood of authoring publications. Hospitalist-led publications in PubMed have been increasing from 36 in 2006 to 179 in the first 10 months of 2013. Of the original research publications (n = 317), the majority were clinical (n = 129, 41%), and 58 (18%) were QI. Thirty-nine (22%) authors reported funding support. Peer-reviewed publications by hospitalists are increasing, suggesting the academic maturation of hospital medicine. Provision of mentorship for hospitalists specifically in QI and guidance toward funding resources may assist in supporting this trend. Journal of Hospital Medicine 2014;9:148-154. © 2014 Society of Hospital Medicine.
    Journal of Hospital Medicine 03/2014; 9(3):148-54. · 2.08 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Objective Update on simulation-based education and its evolution in North America. Data sources Main articles including those published within the last five years and indexed in Medline, and unpublished data from the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada have been analyzed. Data synthesis After a review of historical development of simulation in North America, this article draw the place of simulation in healthcare, for medical education, research and assessment. Funding and accreditation of simulation centres are also discussed. Conclusion Simulation is fully integrated in healthcare in North America and represents one of the main elements for healthcare professional education. Simulation is also a symbol of excellence for health and teaching institutions. The evolution of simulation in North America is likely to inform the future of simulation in France.
    Annales francaises d'anesthesie et de reanimation 05/2014; · 0.77 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Update on simulation-based education and its evolution in North America. Main articles including those published within the last five years and indexed in Medline, and unpublished data from the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada have been analyzed. After a review of historical development of simulation in North America, this article draw the place of simulation in healthcare, for medical education, research and assessment. Funding and accreditation of simulation centres are also discussed. Simulation is fully integrated in healthcare in North America and represents one of the main elements for healthcare professional education. Simulation is also a symbol of excellence for health and teaching institutions. The evolution of simulation in North America is likely to inform the future of simulation in France.
    Annales francaises d'anesthesie et de reanimation 04/2014; · 0.77 Impact Factor

Full-text (2 Sources)

Download
27 Downloads
Available from
Jun 2, 2014