Article

Slip effects in polymer thin films

Department of Experimental Physics, Saarland University, D-66041 Saarbrücken, Germany.
Journal of Physics Condensed Matter (Impact Factor: 2.22). 01/2010; 22(3):033102. DOI: 10.1088/0953-8984/22/3/033102
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Probing the fluid dynamics of thin films is an excellent tool for studying the solid/liquid boundary condition. There is no need for external stimulation or pumping of the liquid, due to the fact that the dewetting process, an internal mechanism, acts as a driving force for liquid flow. Viscous dissipation, within the liquid, and slippage balance interfacial forces. Thus, friction at the solid/liquid interface plays a key role towards the flow dynamics of the liquid. Probing the temporal and spatial evolution of growing holes or retracting straight fronts gives, in combination with theoretical models, information on the liquid flow field and, especially, the boundary condition at the interface. We review the basic models and experimental results obtained during the last several years with exclusive regard to polymers as ideal model liquids for fluid flow. Moreover, concepts that aim to explain slippage on the molecular scale are summarized and discussed.

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Oliver Bäumchen