Article

Guidelines for psychosocial interventions in dementia care: A European survey and comparison

Scientific Institute for Quality of Healthcare and Nijmegen Alzheimer Centre, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.
International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry (Impact Factor: 3.09). 01/2012; 27(1):40-8. DOI: 10.1002/gps.2687
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT The effectiveness of psychosocial interventions in treating people with dementia and their carers is increasingly emphasised in the literature. Dementia guidelines should summarise the scientific evidence and best practice that is currently available, therefore, it should include recommendations for psychosocial interventions. The aims of our study were (1) to collate dementia guidelines from countries across Europe and to check whether they included sections about psychosocial interventions, and (2) to compare the methodological quality and the recommendations for specific psychosocial interventions in these guidelines.
The European dementia guidelines were inventoried. The methodological quality of the guideline sections for psychosocial interventions was assessed with the (AGREE) Appraisal of Guidelines Research and Evaluation instrument. The recommendations for specific psychosocial interventions were extracted from each of these guidelines and compared.
Guidelines for psychosocial interventions were found in five of 12 countries. Guideline developers, methodological quality and appreciation of available evidence influenced the inclusion of psychosocial interventions in dementia guidelines from Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Spain and the UK. The UK NICE SCIE guideline had the best methodological quality and included the most recommendations for psychosocial interventions. Physical activity and carer interventions were recommended the most across all guidelines.
The inclusion of psychosocial interventions in dementia guidelines is limited across Europe. High-quality guidelines that include psychosocial interventions and are kept up to date with the emerging evidence are needed. Throughout Europe, special attention to the implementation of evidence-based psychosocial care is needed in the next few years.

Download full-text

Full-text

Available from: Emmelyne Vasse, Aug 15, 2015
0 Followers
 · 
186 Views
  • Source
    • "Considering all these, providing services for people with dementia has been recognized as a major public health priority in the UK and worldwide (Brookmeyer, Gray & Kawas, 1998; Banerjee, Willis, Mathews, Contell, Chan & Murray, 2007). There is an increasingly higher recognition in the literature, related to the fact that, psychosocial interventions make an essential contribution in dementia care and they are effective also in terms of costs (Knapp et al., 2006; Vasse et al., 2012). Most of these psychosocial interventions aim to improve: cognitive abilities, behavior, mood or quality of life. "
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: There is a high recognition of the fact that psychosocial interventions make an essential contribution in dementia care. However, the evidence for specific psychosocial interventions are mixed and limited yet. Therefore, we performed a meta-analysis of the relevant literature, to investigate the effectiveness of psychosocial interventions focused on improvements in cognition, behavior, mood and quality of life. To select the 10 studies included in the meta-analysis, we conducted an extensive search in the following databases: MEDLINE, PsychINFO, EBSCO, WEB OF SCIENCE. The results we obtained show that psychosocial interventions in dementia for cognitive abilities are effective, even if the effect size is low.
    Procedia - Social and Behavioral Sciences 04/2014; 127:591-594. DOI:10.1016/j.sbspro.2014.03.316
  • Source
    • "Unive r s i ta s Psyc h o l o g i c a V. 12 No. 2 a B r i l -j U n i o 2013 447 la incorporación de tales abordajes a las recomendaciones de guías clínicas de demencia de Europa (Vasse et al., 2012), Estados Unidos (Rabins et al., 2007) y Canadá (Hogan et al., 2008). No obstante , dicho proceso en Latinoamérica ha sido lento e improductivo a la fecha, debido principalmente a la escasez de investigaciones clínicas que validen su aplicación en dicha población. "
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Cognitive Stimulation Therapy (CST) is a psychosocial intervention for people with dementia that has been successful in Anglo-Saxon popu-lation. The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of CST in a sample of Chilean elders. The participants were 22 patients diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease (AD) in mild to moderate stage, who were living in a residential care home in the town of Quillota, Chile. In order to determine the effectiveness of the program, an experimental mixed design 2x2 (repea-ted measures) was employed. The sample was randomly assigned into two doi:10.11144/Javeriana.UPSY12-2.ipec
  • Source
    • "Unive r s i ta s Psyc h o l o g i c a V. 12 No. 2 a B r i l -j U n i o 2013 447 la incorporación de tales abordajes a las recomendaciones de guías clínicas de demencia de Europa (Vasse et al., 2012), Estados Unidos (Rabins et al., 2007) y Canadá (Hogan et al., 2008). No obstante , dicho proceso en Latinoamérica ha sido lento e improductivo a la fecha, debido principalmente a la escasez de investigaciones clínicas que validen su aplicación en dicha población. "
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Cognitive Stimulation Therapy (CST) is a psychosocial intervention for people with dementia that has been successful in Anglo-Saxon population. The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of CST in a sample of Chilean elders. The participants were 22 patients diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease (AD) in mild to moderate stage, who were living in a residential care home in the town of Quillota, Chile. In order to determine the effectiveness of the program, an experimental mixed design 2x2 (repeated measures) was employed. The sample was randomly assigned into two groups: intervention group (IG) and control group (CG). Three dimensions were assessed: cognition, quality of life and functional ability. After the intervention, the IG presented a significant improvement in their cognitive function and quality life. In contrast, the CG did not show positive changes in any dimension. In fact, CG showed a worsening in its cognitive deterioration. Both groups did not showed significant changes in functional ability. Even though intergroup comparisons did not yield significant differences, the IG showed an important improvement in cognitive function, compared with an increase in the progression of cognitive impairment in the CG. It is recommended that future research will contrast these results using a larger sample of people with AD.
    Universitas Psychologica 01/2013; 12(2):445-456. DOI:10.11144/Javeriana.UPSY12-2.ipec · 0.40 Impact Factor
Show more