Evidence for Acne-Promoting Effects of Milk and Other Insulinotropic Dairy Products

Department of Dermatology, Environmental Medicine and Health Theory, University of Osnabrück, Osnabrück, Germany.
Nestle Nutrition workshop series. Paediatric programme 02/2011; 67:131-45. DOI: 10.1159/000325580
Source: PubMed


Acne vulgaris, the most common skin disease of western civilization, has evolved to an epidemic affecting more than 85% of adolescents. Acne can be regarded as an indicator disease of exaggerated insulinotropic western nutrition. Especially milk and whey protein-based products contribute to elevations of postprandial insulin and basal insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) plasma levels. It is the evolutional principle of mammalian milk to promote growth and support anabolic conditions for the neonate during the nursing period. Whey proteins are most potent inducers of glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide secreted by enteroendocrine K cells which in concert with hydrolyzed whey protein-derived essential amino acids stimulate insulin secretion of pancreatic β-cells. Increased insulin/IGF-I signaling activates the phosphoinositide-3 kinase/Akt pathway, thereby reducing the nuclear content of the transcription factor FoxO1, the key nutrigenomic regulator of acne target genes. Nuclear FoxO1 deficiency has been linked to all major factors of acne pathogenesis, i.e. androgen receptor transactivation, comedogenesis, increased sebaceous lipogenesis, and follicular inflammation. The elimination of the whey protein-based insulinotropic mechanisms of milk will be the most important future challenge for nutrition research. Both, restriction of milk consumption or generation of less insulinotropic milk will have an enormous impact on the prevention of epidemic western diseases like obesity, diabetes mellitus, cancer, neurodegenerative diseases and acne.

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Available from: Bodo Melnik, Oct 04, 2015
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    • "Milk produced persistently by pregnant cows contains substantial amounts of steroids and androgen-precursors, which have been suggested to play another role in acne pathogenesis [33,34]. Moreover, another group has proposed a hypothesis for the diet-induced impact of insulin/IGF-1 signaling in acne, as both high glycemic load and dairy proteins increase the serum levels of insulin and IGF-1, important promoters of sebaceous glands and sebaceous lipogenesis [35,36]. In contrast to our study, a positive association between acne with cheese intake was found [8]. "
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    ABSTRACT: The role of dietary factors in the pathophysiology of acne vulgaris is highly controversial. Hence, the aim of this study was to determine the association between dietary factors and acne vulgaris among Malaysian young adults. A case-control study was conducted among 44 acne vulgaris patients and 44 controls aged 18 to 30 years from October 2010 to January 2011. Comprehensive acne severity scale (CASS) was used to determine acne severity. A questionnaire comprising items enquiring into the respondent's family history and dietary patterns was distributed. Subjects were asked to record their food intake on two weekdays and one day on a weekend in a three day food diary. Anthropometric measurements including body weight, height and body fat percentage were taken. Acne severity was assessed by a dermatologist. Cases had a significantly higher dietary glycemic load (175 ± 35) compared to controls (122 ± 28) (p < 0.001). The frequency of milk (p < 0.01) and ice-cream (p < 0.01) consumptions was significantly higher in cases compared to controls. Females in the case group had a higher daily energy intake compared to their counterparts in the control group, 1812 ± 331 and 1590 ± 148 kcal respectively (p < 0.05). No significant difference was found in other nutrient intakes, Body Mass Index, and body fat percentage between case and control groups (p > 0.05). Glycemic load diet and frequencies of milk and ice cream intake were positively associated with acne vulgaris.
    BMC Dermatology 08/2012; 12(1):13. DOI:10.1186/1471-5945-12-13
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    • "In contrast, up-regulated IIS by Western diet appears to promote the development of chronic diseases of civilization. Paleolithic diet, which excludes hyperglycemic carbohydrates and insulinotropic dairy, has been successfully introduced for the prevention and treatment of acne, T2D and cardiovascular diseases [16,29]. Future efforts should be undertaken to lower the high insulinemic index of milk (I.I. 140) and other whey-based milk products to reach values of beef (I.I. 51) or cheese (I.I. 45) [16,29]. "
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    ABSTRACT: ABSTRACT: The insulin/insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) pathway drives an evolutionarily conserved network that regulates lifespan and longevity. Individuals with Laron syndrome who carry mutations in the growth hormone receptor (GHR) gene that lead to severe congenital IGF-1 deficiency with decreased insulin/IGF-1 signaling (IIS) exhibit reduced prevalence rates of acne, diabetes and cancer. Western diet with high intake of hyperglycemic carbohydrates and insulinotropic dairy over-stimulates IIS. The reduction of IIS in Laron subjects unmasks the potential role of persistent hyperactive IIS mediated by Western diet in the development of diseases of civilization and offers a rational perspective for dietary adjustments with less insulinotropic diets like the Paleolithic diet.
    Nutrition & Metabolism 06/2011; 8(1):41. DOI:10.1186/1743-7075-8-41 · 3.26 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Hidradenitis suppurativa (HS) is a chronic, inflammatory, scarring condition involving the intertriginous skin of the axillary, inguinal, inframammary, genital, and perineal areas of the body. It is also referred to as acne inversa and Verneuil disease. Follicular occlusion is the primary event in HS. It is now accepted that the first pathogenetic change is in the pilosebaceous follicular ducts, like acne, and so there has been a move to rename this disorder acne inversa. Despite the legitimate argument that hidradenitis suppurativa is a misnomer, the term has become generally accepted.
    Dermatologic clinics 10/2010; 28(4):779-93. DOI:10.1016/j.det.2010.07.003 · 1.69 Impact Factor
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