Article

Hypoxia and Inflammation

Department of Anesthesiology, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, CO 80045, USA.
New England Journal of Medicine (Impact Factor: 54.42). 02/2011; 364(7):656-65. DOI: 10.1056/NEJMra0910283
Source: PubMed
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