Article

Homocysteine levels and the metabolic syndrome in a Mediterranean population: a case-control study.

Hemorheology and Hemostasis Unit, Service of Clinical Pathology, La Fe University Hospital, Valencia, Spain. vaya
Clinical hemorheology and microcirculation (Impact Factor: 3.4). 01/2011; 47(1):59-66. DOI: 10.3233/CH-2010-1366
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Hyperhomocysteinemia (HH) and metabolic syndrome (MS) are associated with increased cardiovascular risk. However, whether there is a link between MS or its components and homocysteine levels in a population without cardiovascular disease is not well established. We conducted a case-control study in 61 MS patients (41 males, 20 females, aged 51 ± 11 years) and in 98 controls without MS (59 males, 39 females, aged 50 ± 10 years) to ascertain the association between MS and HH, and with inflammatory markers. MS was classified according to the updated ATPIII criteria [17]. No differences in homocysteine levels were observed when comparing MS patients and controls (12.0 ± 3.18 μM vs. 11.9 ± 3.5 μM, p = 0.829). No association was found between HH (homocysteine >15 μM) and MS, its components (abdominal obesity (p = 0.635), hypertension (0.229), low-HDL cholesterol (p = 0.491), glucose >100 mg/dL (0.485), hypertriglyceridemia (p = 0.490)) or the number of MS components (p = 272). When considering glucose >110 mg/dL (NCEP-ATPIII criteria, 2001) instead of glucose intolerancen >100 mg/dl (updated ATPIII criteria, Grundy, 2005), a borderline association with HH was observed (p = 0.054) of statistical significance (p = 0.008) when glucose >126 mg/dL was considered. In a multivariate regression model, creatinine, folic acid and vitamin B12 were the only independent predictors of homocysteine levels (p < 0.05). Although MS correlated with inflammatory parameters (fibrinogen, hs-RCP, plasma viscosity and leukocyte count, p < 0.001), no association was found between HH and the above-mentioned parameters (p > 0.05). Our results do not indicate a link between SM or its individual components with HH, and diabetes was the only relevant contribution. Cardiovascular disease risk due to MS and HH seems to share no common mechanisms.

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