Article

Association between brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity and occult coronary artery disease detected by multi-detector computed tomography

Asan Heart Institute, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, South Korea.
International journal of cardiology (Impact Factor: 6.18). 02/2011; 157(2):227-32. DOI: 10.1016/j.ijcard.2011.01.045
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Arterial stiffness, assessed by aortic pulse wave velocity (PWV), has been reported to predict cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. We assessed the association between arterial stiffness, as determined by PWV, and occult coronary artery disease (CAD), as detected by multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT), in asymptomatic individuals.
We retrospectively enrolled 615 consecutive South Korean individuals who had undergone both brachial-ankle PWV (baPWV) and coronary CT angiography during general routine health evaluations at the Asan Medical Center in 2008.
We found that baPWV was positively correlated with age; body mass index; blood pressure; total cholesterol, homocysteine, and fasting blood glucose concentrations; and coronary artery calcium score. When we divided subjects into two groups according to the results of MDCT, we found that baPWV was significantly higher in subjects with (diameter of stenosis >50%) than without CAD (1573.2 ± 275.6 cm/s vs. 1409.6 ± 235.6 cm/s, p<0.01). The optimal baPWV cutoff value for detection of significant coronary arterial stenosis was 1426.0 cm/s, which had a sensitivity of 77% and a specificity of 63% (area under curve=0.71). After adjusting for age, smoking status, hypertension, diabetes, and dyslipidemia, the odds ratio for significant occult CAD was 3.30 (95% CI=1.47-7.41, p<0.01).
We found that baPWV was associated with risk factors for cardiovascular disease, including CACS, in asymptomatic individuals, and the optimal baPWV cutoff value for occult CAD detected by MDCT was 1426 cm/s. These findings suggest that baPWV may be a useful screening tool for predicting occult CAD.

1 Follower
 · 
101 Views
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Study Objectives: We aimed to examine the association between sleep duration and arterial stiffness among adults of different ages, because to date there has been only one study on this relationship, which was confined to middle-aged civil servants. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: A health examination center in National Cheng Kung University Hospital, Taiwan. Participants: A total of 3,508 subjects, age 20-87 y, were enrolled after excluding those with a history of cerebrovascular events, coronary artery disease, peripheral artery disease, and taking lipid-lowering drugs, antihypertensives, hypoglycemic agents, and anti-inflammatory drugs, from October 2006 to August 2009. Interventions: N/A. Measurements and Results: Sleep duration was classified into three groups: short (<6 h), normal (6-8 h) and long (>8 h). Arterial stiffness was measured by brachial-ankle pulse-wave velocity (baPWV), and increased arterial stiffness was defined as baPWV >= 1400 cm/sec. The sleep duration was different for subjects with and without increased arterial stiffness in males, but not in females. In the multivariate analysis for males, long sleepers (odds ratio [OR] 1.75, P = 0.034) but not short sleepers (OR 0.98, P = 0.92) had a higher risk of increased arterial stiffness. In addition, age, estimated glomerular filtration rate, hypertension, diabetes, total cholesterol/high-density lipoprotein cholesterol ratio, cigarette smoking, and exercise were also independently associated factors. However, in females, neither short nor long sleep duration was associated with increased arterial stiffness. Conclusions: Long sleep duration was associated with a higher risk of increased arterial stiffness in males. Short sleepers did not exhibit a significant risk of increased arterial stiffness in either sex.
    Sleep 08/2014; 37(8):1315-20. DOI:10.5665/sleep.3920 · 5.06 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Despite recent interest in differential impact of body size phenotypes on cardiovascular outcomes and mortality, studies evaluating the association between body size phenotypes and indicators of atherosclerosis are limited. This study investigated the relationship of metabolically abnormal but normal weight (MANW) and metabolically healthy but obese (MHO) individuals with arterial stiffness and carotid atherosclerosis in Korean adults without cardiovascular disease. A total of 1012 participants (575 men and 437 women, mean age 50.8 years), who underwent a health examination between April 2012 and May 2013 were prospectively enrolled based on inclusion and exclusion criteria. Study subjects were classified according to body mass index (BMI) and the presence/absence of metabolic syndrome. The prevalence of metabolically healthy normal weight (MHNW), MANW, MHO, and metabolically abnormal obese (MAO) were 54.84%, 6.42%, 22.83%, and 15.91%, respectively. Individuals with MANW had significantly higher brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity and maximal carotid intima-media thickness values than those with MHO, after adjusting for age and gender (P = 0.026 and P = 0.018, respectively). The odds ratio (OR) of arterial stiffness and carotid atherosclerosis in the MANW group were significantly higher than in the MHNW group in unadjusted models. Furthermore, multivariable models showed that increased OR of carotid atherosclerosis in the MANW group persisted even after adjusting for confounding factors (OR = 2.98, 95% CI = [1.54, 5.73], P = 0.011). Compared to MHNW or MHO subjects, Korean men and women with the MANW phenotype exhibited increased arterial stiffness and carotid atherosclerosis. NCT01594710.
    Atherosclerosis 03/2014; 234(1):218-223. DOI:10.1016/j.atherosclerosis.2014.02.033 · 3.97 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Background. - Studies on the association between family history of cardiovascular disease and arterial stiffness are rare. Aims. - This study evaluated the possible relationship between family history of cardiovascular disease and arterial stiffness in the Japanese population, by measuring brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (ba-PWV). Methods. - A total of 1004 eligible subjects (664 men and 340 women) aged 35-69 years, who were enrolled in the baseline survey of a cohort study in Tokushima Prefecture (Japan) and who underwent ba-PWV measurement, were analysed. Information about their lifestyle characteristics and first-degree family histories of ischaemic heart disease (i.e. myocardial infarction or angina pectoris), stroke or hypertension were obtained from a structural self-administered questionnaire. Results. - Subjects of both sexes with a family history of stroke showed significantly higher multivariable-adjusted means of ba-PWV than those without that trait (P values were 0.001 in men and 0.002 in women), while those with a family history of ischaemic heart disease did not. Subjects of both sexes with a family history of hypertension showed significantly higher age-adjusted means of ba-PWV than those without that trait, although these differences disappeared after further adjusting for blood pressure or multivariable covariates. When family histories of these diseases were inserted simultaneously into the same model, these results did not alter substantially. Conclusion. - A family history of stroke might be associated with increased arterial stiffness, independent of other known atherosclerotic risk factors, including hypertensive elements, in both sexes in the Japanese population.
    Archives of Cardiovascular Diseases 09/2014; 107(12). DOI:10.1016/j.acvd.2014.07.047 · 1.66 Impact Factor