Article

Class III β-tubulin expression in advanced-stage serous ovarian carcinoma effusions is associated with poor survival and primary chemoresistance.

Department of Gynecologic Oncology, Oslo University Hospital, Norwegian Radium Hospital, N-0424 Oslo, Norway.
Human pathology (Impact Factor: 3.03). 02/2011; 42(7):1019-26. DOI: 10.1016/j.humpath.2010.10.025
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT The objective of this study was to analyze the clinical role of nestin, a stem cell marker, and class III β-tubulin in advanced-stage serous ovarian carcinoma. Nestin and class III β-tubulin protein expression were investigated in 217 effusions using immunohistochemistry. Results were analyzed for association with clinicopathologic parameters including chemotherapy response and survival. Class III β-tubulin and nestin were expressed in tumor cells in 98.6% and 95.6% of specimens, respectively. Staining extent was comparable in prechemotherapy and postchemotherapy effusions. No association was found with patient age, histologic grade, International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage, primary surgery versus secondary debulking, or residual disease volume. High class III β-tubulin expression in prechemotherapy effusions was significantly associated with primary chemoresistance (progression-free survival <6 months; P = .036) and with a trend for less favorable response to first-line treatment (P = .054). In univariate survival analysis, high class III β-tubulin expression in prechemotherapy effusions was significantly associated with poor overall survival (P = .021), with a trend for poor progression-free survival (P = .067). These associations did not have independent prognostic value in Cox multivariate analysis. Nestin expression was unrelated to chemoresistance or survival. Both class III β-tubulin and nestin are frequently expressed in serous ovarian carcinoma cells in effusions. Nestin does not provide predictive or prognostic data in this patient group, whereas class III β-tubulin expression in prechemotherapy effusions is associated with poor chemoresponse and shorter survival, suggesting that it may be a therapeutic target in ovarian cancer.

0 Bookmarks
 · 
132 Views
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Evidence suggests that class III β-tubulin (βIII-tubulin) may represent a prognostic and predictive molecular marker in prostate cancer. βIII-Tubulin expression was determined by IHC in 8179 prostate cancer specimens in a TMA format. Results were compared with tumor phenotype, biochemical recurrence, electroretinographic (ERG) status, and deletions on PTEN, 3p13, 5q21, and 6q15. βIII-Tubulin expression was detectable in 25.6% of 8179 interpretable cancers. High βIII-tubulin expression was strongly associated with both TMPRSS2:ERG rearrangement and ERG expression (P < 0.0001 each). High βIII-tubulin expression was tightly linked to high Gleason grade, advanced pT stage, and early prostate-specific antigen (PSA) recurrence in all cancers (P < 0.0001 each), but also in the subgroups of ERG-negative and ERG-positive cancers. When all tumors were analyzed, the prognostic role of βIII-tubulin expression was independent of Gleason grade, pT stage, pN stage, surgical margin status, and preoperative PSA. Independent prognostic value became even more evident if the analysis was limited to preoperatively available features, such as biopsy specimen Gleason grade, preoperative PSA, cT stage, and βIII-tubulin expression (P < 0.0001 each). βIII-Tubulin expression was associated with PTEN (P < 0.0001) when all tumors were analyzed, but also in the subgroups of ERG-negative and ERG-positive cancers. βIII-Tubulin expression is an independent prognostic parameter. The significant associations with key genomic alterations of prostate cancer, such as TMPRSS2:ERG fusions and PTEN deletions, suggest interactions with several pivotal pathways involved in prostate cancer.
    American Journal Of Pathology 12/2013; · 4.60 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The objective of this study was to analyze the expression and clinical role of the high mobility group AT hook (HMGA) protein in advanced-stage serous ovarian carcinoma. HMGA2 protein expression was investigated in 199 effusions and in 50 patient-matched primary tumors and solid metastases using immunohistochemistry. Results were analyzed for association with clinicopathologic parameters, including chemotherapy response, and survival. HMGA2 was expressed in tumor cells in 94.5 %, 96 %, and 90 % of specimens, respectively. There was no difference in HMGA2 expression between patient-matched samples from different anatomic sites (p > 0.3). HMGA2 expression in chemo-naïve samples was significantly higher in older patients (p = 0.006, p = 0.01, and p = 0.005 for effusions, primary tumors, and solid metastases, respectively). No association was found with residual disease volume. Furthermore, HMGA2 expression was not associated with FIGO stage (p > 0.2), except in chemo-naïve effusions (n = 106, p = 0.016). There was no difference in HMGA2 expression between chemo-naïve samples and samples obtained post-chemotherapy in effusions (p = 0.2) or primary tumors (p = 0.1). However, solid metastases obtained after chemotherapy exposure had higher HMGA2 expression compared with chemo-naïve samples (p = 0.032). HMGA2 expression was unrelated to chemotherapy response or survival. However, it was directly related to protein expression of the previously studied cancer stem cell marker Nestin (p = 0.01) and the gap junction protein claudin-7 (p = 0.02) and inversely related to the mRNA level of the E-cadherin repressor SIP1 (p = 0.02). This study provides evidence that HMGA2 is universally expressed in advanced-stage ovarian serous carcinoma irrespective of anatomic site, suggesting that HMGA2 may have a clinical role as therapeutic target.
    Archiv für Pathologische Anatomie und Physiologie und für Klinische Medicin 04/2012; 460(5):505-13. · 2.68 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Introduction: βIII-Tubulin (TUBB3) is predominantly expressed in neurons of the central and peripheral nervous systems, while in normal non-neoplastic tissues it is barely detectable. By contrast, this cytoskeletal protein is abundant in a wide range of tumors. βIII-Tubulin is linked to dynamic instability of microtubules (MTs), weakening the effects of agents interfering with MT polymerization. Based on this principle, early studies introduced the classical theory linking βIII-tubulin with a mechanism of counteracting taxane activity and accordingly, prompted its investigation as a predictive biomarker of taxane resistance. Areas covered: We reviewed 59 translational studies, including cohorts from lung, ovarian, breast, gastric, colorectal and various miscellaneous cancers subject to different chemotherapy regimens. Expert opinion: βIII-Tubulin functions more as a prognostic factor than as a predictor of response to chemotherapy. We believe this view can be explained by βIII-tubulin's association with prosurvival pathways in the early steps of the metastatic process. Its prognostic response increases if combined with additional biomarkers that regulate its expression, since βIII-tubulin can be expressed in conditions, such as estrogen exposure, unrelated to survival mechanisms and without any predictive activity. Additional avenues for therapeutic intervention could emerge if drugs are designed to directly target βIII-tubulin and its mechanism of regulation.
    Expert Opinion on Therapeutic Targets 02/2013; · 4.90 Impact Factor