Article

Behavioral correlates of anxiety

Department of Psychiatry, University of California, 9500 Gilman Drive, MC0804, La Jolla, San Diego, CA 92093, USA.
Current topics in behavioral neurosciences 01/2010; 2(2):205-28. DOI: 10.1007/7854_2009_11
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT The tripartite model of anxiety includes three response domains: cognitive (most often identified by self report), behavioral, and physiological. Each is suggested to bring a separate element of response characteristics and, in some cases, potentially independent underlying mechanisms to the construct of anxiety. In this chapter, commonly used behavioral correlates of anxiety in human research, including startle reflex, attentional bias, and avoidance tasks, as well as future tasks using virtual reality technology will be discussed. The focus will be in evaluating their translational utility supported by (1) convergent validity with other measures of anxiety traits or anxiety disorders, (2) their use in identifying neural and genetic mechanisms of anxiety, and (3) ability to predict treatment efficacy.

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Available from: Victoria B Risbrough, Aug 19, 2015
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