Article

Structural biology: a new look for the APC.

Nature (Impact Factor: 42.35). 02/2011; 470(7333):182-3. DOI: 10.1038/470182a
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Solving the structure of protein complexes is particularly challenging when they contain many subunits. In the case of the APC, a fruitful strategy has been to gain information by subtracting subunits. See Article p.227 and Letter p.274

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