Article

Regulation of fatty acid metabolism by cell autonomous circadian clocks: time to fatten up on information?

Department of Epidemiology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama 35294, USA.
Journal of Biological Chemistry (Impact Factor: 4.6). 02/2011; 286(14):11883-9. DOI: 10.1074/jbc.R110.214643
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Molecular, cellular, and animal-based studies have recently exposed circadian clocks as critical regulators of energy balance. Invariably, mouse models of genetically manipulated circadian clock components display features indicative of altered lipid/fatty acid metabolism, including differential adiposity and circulating lipids. The purpose of this minireview is to provide a comprehensive summary of current knowledge regarding the regulation of fatty acid metabolism by distinct cell autonomous circadian clocks. The implications of these recent findings for cardiometabolic disease and human health are discussed.

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