Article

Sodium dodecyl sulfate coated alumina modified with a new Schiff's base as a uranyl ion selective adsorbent

Department of Chemistry, College of Science, Shiraz University, 71454 Shiraz, Iran.
Journal of hazardous materials (Impact Factor: 4.33). 03/2011; 187(1-3):75-81. DOI: 10.1016/j.jhazmat.2010.12.053
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT A simple and selective method was used for the preconcentration and determination of uranium(VI) by solid-phase extraction (SPE). In this method, a column of alumina modified with sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and a new Schiff's base ligand was prepared for the preconcentration of trace uranyl(VI) from water samples. The uranium(VI) was completely eluted with HCl 2M and determined by a spectrophotometeric method with Arsenazo(III). The preconcentration steps were studied with regard to experimental parameters such as amount of extractant, type, volume and concentration of eluent, pH, flow rate of sample source and tolerance limit of diverse ions on the recovery of uranyl ion. A preconcentration factor more than 200 was achieved and the average recovery of uranyl(VI) was 99.5%. The relative standard deviation was 1.1% for 10 replicate determinations of uranyl(VI) ion in a solution with a concentration of 5 μg mL(-1). This method was successfully used for the determination of spiked uranium in natural water samples.

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    • "Thus, a separation and preconcentration step prior to its spectrophtometric determination is required. The most widely techniques used for the separation and preconcentration of uranium prior to its spectrophotometric determination are liquid–liquid extraction [8] [9] [10], solid phase extraction [11] [12] [13] [14] [15] [16] [17] [18] [19] and cloud point extraction [20] [21] [22] [23] [24]. However, the separation and preconcentration factors obtained by most of these methods are not sufficient for spectrophotometric determination of ultra trace amounts of uranium, some of them use expensive reagent [12–15,23] and usually require high volume of sample. "
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    ABSTRACT: A solid phase extraction method using antimony ion imprinted polymer (IIP) sorbent combined with electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) was developed for the extraction and speciation of antimony. The sorbent has been synthesised in the presence of Sb(III) and ammonium pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (APDC) using styrene as the monomer and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EGDMA) as the cross linker. The imprinted Sb(III) ions were removed by leaching with HCl (50%v/v) and the polymer was characterised by FT-IR and scanning electron microscopy. The maximum sorption capacity of the IIP for Sb(III) ions was found to be 6.7mgg(-1). With preconcentration of 60mL of sample, an enhancement factor of 232 and detection limit of 3.9ngL(-1) was obtained. Total antimony was determined after the reduction of Sb(V) to Sb(III). The method was successfully applied to the determination of antimony species in water samples and total antimony in fruit juices.
    Food Chemistry 02/2014; 145C:571-577. DOI:10.1016/j.foodchem.2013.08.110 · 3.26 Impact Factor
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    • "Thus, a separation and preconcentration step prior to its spectrophtometric determination is required. The most widely techniques used for the separation and preconcentration of uranium prior to its spectrophotometric determination are liquid–liquid extraction [8] [9] [10], solid phase extraction [11] [12] [13] [14] [15] [16] [17] [18] [19] and cloud point extraction [20] [21] [22] [23] [24]. However, the separation and preconcentration factors obtained by most of these methods are not sufficient for spectrophotometric determination of ultra trace amounts of uranium, some of them use expensive reagent [12–15,23] and usually require high volume of sample. "
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    ABSTRACT: A simple and sensitive method for the separation and preconcentration of the ultra trace amounts of uranium and its determination by spectrophotometry was developed. The method is based on the combination of solid phase extraction and dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction. Thus, by passing the sample through the basic alumina column, the uranyl ion and some cations are separated from the sample matrix. The retained uranyl ion along with the cations are eluted with 5mL of nitric acid (2molL(-1)) and after neutralization of the eluent, the extracted uranyl ion is converted to its anionic benzoate complex and is separated from other cations by extraction of its ion pair with malachite green into small volume of chloroform using dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction. The amount of uranium is then determined by the absorption measurement of the extracted ion pair at 621nm using flow injection spectrophotometry. Under the optimum conditions, with 500mL of the sample, a preconcentration factor of 1980, a detection limit of 40ngL(-1), and a relative standard deviation of 4.1% (n=6) at 400ngL(-1) were obtained. The method was successfully applied to the determination of uranium in mineral water, river water, well water, spring water and sea water samples.
    Journal of hazardous materials 10/2013; 263. DOI:10.1016/j.jhazmat.2013.10.028 · 4.33 Impact Factor
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    • "A solid-phase extractant consists of two parts: a matrix and functional components. Commonly used materials for the matrix can be divided into the following groups: (i) minerals: such as clay [20] [21], diatomite [16], and zeolite [22]; (ii) simple inorganic oxides: for instance, alumina [23] or silica [9] [13]; (iii) polymers/copolymers: e.g. resins and related materials [12] [24] [25]; (iv) carbonaceous materials: for example, activated carbon (AC) [5] [26], mesoporous carbon [27] [28], carbon nanotubes (CNTs) [29], graphite and its derivatives [8]; (v) biomass or biosorbent: like chitosan [30] and brown alga [31]; (vi) others: hybrid materials/composites [11] [32] [33], gels [34] [35], metal-organic frameworks [36], etc. "
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