Article

Gender and treatment response in substance use treatment-mandated parolees.

Rhode Island Hospital, Providence, RI, USA.
Journal of substance abuse treatment (Impact Factor: 2.9). 04/2011; 40(3):313-21. DOI: 10.1016/j.jsat.2010.11.013
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Well-controlled, randomized studies of correctional interventions examining gender effects are rare. This study examined gender main effects and gender × treatment interactions in a multisite randomized trial (N = 431) comparing a new form of correctional supervision for drug-involved offenders (collaborative behavioral management [CBM]) to standard parole. Outcomes included repeated measures of yes/no use of primary drug, alcohol use, and recidivism during 9 months postrelease. Generalized estimating equation analyses indicated that despite using harder drugs at baseline, women were less likely than men to use their primary drug and to use alcohol during the follow-up period. No gender-related differences in recidivism were found. Treatment interacted with gender to predict alcohol use, with women in CBM reporting the best alcohol outcomes (only 5% of women used alcohol during the follow-up period). The clear expectations, positive reinforcement, recognition of successes, fairness, and support present in CBM may be particularly important for women parolees.

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