Article

Chemoprevention of hormone receptor-negative breast cancer: new approaches needed.

Department of Clinical Cancer Prevention, The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77230, USA.
Recent results in cancer research. Fortschritte der Krebsforschung. Progrès dans les recherches sur le cancer 01/2011; 188:147-62. DOI: 10.1007/978-3-642-10858-7_13
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Results from clinical trials have demonstrated that it is possible to prevent estrogen-responsive breast cancers by targeting the estrogen receptor with selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) (tamoxifen, raloxifene, or lasofoxifene) or with aromatase inhibitors (AIs) (anastrozole, letrozole, or exemestene). Results from breast cancer treatment trials suggest that aromatase inhibitors may be even more effective in preventing breast cancer than SERMs. However, while SERMs and aromatase inhibitors do prevent the development of many ER-positive breast cancers, these drugs do not prevent ER-negative breast cancer. These results show that new approaches are needed for the prevention of this aggressive form of breast cancer. Our laboratory and clinical efforts have been focused on identifying critical molecular pathways in breast cells that can be targeted for the prevention of ER-negative breast cancer. Our preclinical studies have demonstrated that other nuclear receptors, such as RXR receptors, vitamin D receptors, as well as others are critical for the growth of ER-negative breast cells and for the transformation of these cells into ER-negative cancers. Other studies show that growth factor pathways including those activated by EGFR, Her2, and IGFR, which are activated in many ER-negative breast cancers, can be targeted for the prevention of ER-negative breast cancer in mice. Clinical studies have also shown that PARP inhibitors are effective for the treatment of breast cancers arising in BRCA-1 or -2 mutation carriers, suggesting that targeting PARP may also be useful for the prevention of breast cancers arising in these high-risk individuals. Most recently, we have demonstrated that ER-negative breast cancers can be subdivided into four distinct groups based on the kinases that they express. These groups include ER-negative/Her-2-positive groups (the MAPK and immunomodulatory groups) and ER-negative/Her2-negative groups (the S6K and the cell cycle checkpoint groups). These groups of ER-negative breast cancers can be targeted with kinase inhibitors specific for each subgroup. These preclinical studies have supported the development of several clinical trials testing targeted agents for the prevention of breast cancer. The results of a completed Phase II cancer prevention trial using the RXR ligand bexarotene in women at high risk of breast cancer will be reviewed, and the current status of an ongoing Phase II trial using the EGFR and Her2 kinase inhibitor lapatinib for the treatment of women with DCIS breast cancer will be presented. It is anticipated that in the future these molecularly targeted drugs will be combined with hormonal agents such as SERMs or aromatase inhibitors to prevent all forms of breast cancer.

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