Article

The Serotonin Transporter Promoter Variant (5-HTTLPR), Stress, and Depression Meta-analysis Revisited

Department of Human Genetics, University of Wuerzburg, Wuerzburg, Germany.
Archives of general psychiatry (Impact Factor: 13.75). 05/2011; 68(5):444-54. DOI: 10.1001/archgenpsychiatry.2010.189
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Two recent meta-analyses assessed the set of studies exploring the interaction between a serotonin transporter promoter polymorphism (5-HTTLPR) and stress in the development of depression and concluded that the evidence did not support the presence of the interaction. However, even the larger of the meta-analyses included only 14 of the 56 studies that have assessed the relationship between 5-HTTLPR, stress, and depression.
To perform a meta-analysis including all relevant studies exploring the interaction.
We identified studies published through November 2009 in PubMed.
We excluded 2 studies presenting data that were included in other larger studies.
To perform a more inclusive meta-analysis, we used the Liptak-Stouffer z score method to combine findings of primary studies at the level of significance tests rather than the level of raw data.
We included 54 studies and found strong evidence that 5-HTTLPR moderates the relationship between stress and depression, with the 5-HTTLPR s allele associated with an increased risk of developing depression under stress (P = .00002). When stratifying our analysis by the type of stressor studied, we found strong evidence for an association between the s allele and increased stress sensitivity in the childhood maltreatment (P = .00007) and the specific medical condition (P = .0004) groups of studies but only marginal evidence for an association in the stressful life events group (P = .03). When restricting our analysis to the studies included in the previous meta-analyses, we found no evidence of association (Munafò et al studies, P = .16; Risch et al studies, P = .11). This suggests that the difference in results between meta-analyses was due to the different set of included studies rather than the meta-analytic technique.
Contrary to the results of the smaller earlier meta-analyses, we find strong evidence that the studies published to date support the hypothesis that 5-HTTLPR moderates the relationship between stress and depression.

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Available from: Srijan Sen, Jun 30, 2015
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