Article

A mindful eating group as an adjunct to individual treatment for eating disorders: a pilot study.

Eating disorders 01/2011; 19(1):6-16. DOI: 10.1080/10640266.2011.533601
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT The objective of this study was to investigate potential benefits of a Mindful Eating Group as an adjunct to long-term treatment for a variety of eating disorders. Individuals (N = 33) attending treatment at an outpatient treatment facility participated in the 10-week intervention designed to enhance awareness around hunger and satiety cues. Disordered eating symptoms were assessed pre- and post-intervention using the EAT-26. Significant reductions were found on all subscales of the EAT-26 with large effect sizes. No significant differences were identified between eating disorder diagnoses. Results suggest potential benefits of an adjunct mindfulness group intervention when treating a variety of eating disorders. Limitations are discussed.

2 Followers
 · 
147 Views
  • Source
    • "Mindfulness has been studied extensively in Western science in recent decades (Greeson, 2009) and of relevance to the present investigation has been innovatively integrated into psychological and behavioral interventions for eating disorders (see Wolever & Best, 2009, for a review), and for enhancing the regulation of weight and metabolism (e.g., Daubenmier et al., 2011). Therefore, when applied to the context of eating mindfulness invokes a discerning though relaxed awareness of the intricacies of the entire eating process by cultivating a multisensory engagement of the complex interplay between internal (e.g., thoughts, emotions, hunger, and satiety cues; Hepworth, 2011; Kristeller & Wolever, 2011) and external (e.g., the tastes, textures, aromas, and colors of foods; contextual triggers such as the influence of food advertisements and social situations involving tempting foods: Framson et al., 2009) factors that regulate appetite and food intake. Of note, Grinnell and colleagues were the first to explore the relationship between mindfulness, weight-related behaviors, and anthropometric parameters among first-year college students (Grinnell, Greene, Melanson, Blissmer, & Lofgren, 2011). "
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: To evaluate the association between weight gain and psychological dimensions of appetite, a sample of 83 ethnically diverse first-year undergraduate females had body mass index (BMI) assessed and completed self-report measures of hedonic hunger, mindfulness, and intuitive eating. Positive associations between mindfulness and intuitive eating and negative links between intuitive eating and hedonic hunger and BMI were observed over time. BMI gainers experienced a significant decline in intuitive eating across the first college semester. No significant between-group effects for mindfulness or hedonic hunger were detected. Preliminary results suggest that changes in internally derived appetite- and consumption-regulating processes may underlie weight gain during the first-year college transition. Implications for optimizing college health promotion efforts for young women at this developmental juncture are discussed.
    SAGE Open 10/2013; Oct-Dec:1-8. DOI:10.1177/2158244013507435
  • Source
    • "Despite the need for effective interventions to reduce overeating and obesity, mindful eating studies have not targeted obese minority women. Researchers have used mindful eating interventions in samples including both men and women (Annesi & Gorjala, 2010; Courbasson et al., 2011; Smith et al., 2006); obese community volunteers (Annesi & Gorjala, 2010; Kristeller & Hallett, 1999; Tapper et al., 2009); persons with comorbid substance abuse (Courbasson et al., 2011), and persons in treatment for an eating disorder (Albers, 2011; Baer et al., 2005; Hepworth, 2011; Kristeller & Hallett, 1999; Smith et al., 2006). Some researchers have reported outcomes of mindfulness education while providing minimal demographic data on participants (Caldwell et al., 2012), or without noting initial BMI or changes following intervention (Courbasson et al., 2011; Smith et al., 2006). "
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this mixed methods study was to: 1) describe the effect of an 8-week mindful eating intervention on mindful eating, weight loss self-efficacy, depression, and biomarkers of weight in urban, underserved, obese women; and 2) identify themes of the lived experience of mindful eating. A convenience sample of 12 obese women was recruited with data collected at baseline and 8weeks followed by a focus group. Only self-efficacy for weight loss significantly increased over 8weeks (t=-2.63, P=.04). Qualitative findings of mindful eating supported quantitative findings and extended understanding about the effect of the intervention.
    Archives of psychiatric nursing 10/2013; 27(5):211-8. DOI:10.1016/j.apnu.2013.05.004 · 1.03 Impact Factor
  • Source
    • "Importantly, the authors report that the improvements recorded post-treatment were maintained at one-year follow-up suggesting that the effects of acceptance-based therapies are durable over time. In another case series study, Hepworth (2010) examined the effect of a mindful-eating group (based on DBT principles) in individuals diagnosed with a range of EDs, including AN. After 10 group sessions of mindful eating, participants reported significantly lower scores on food avoidance and on desire to be thin compared to pre-treatment. "
    03/2013; 2(1):42-52. DOI:10.1080/21662630.2013.795755
Show more