Article

Theme issue on e-mental health: a growing field in internet research.

Journal of Medical Internet Research (Impact Factor: 4.67). 01/2010; 12(5):e74. DOI: 10.2196/jmir.1713
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT This theme issue on e-mental health presents 16 articles from leading researchers working on systems and theories related to supporting and improving mental health conditions and mental health care using information and communication technologies. In this editorial, we present the background of this theme issue, and highlight the content of this issue.

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Available from: Heleen Riper, May 29, 2015
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