Article

Photothermal nanoblade for patterned cell membrane cutting

Department of Electrical Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA.
Optics Express (Impact Factor: 3.53). 10/2010; 18(22):23153-60. DOI: 10.1364/OE.18.023153
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT We report a photothermal nanoblade that utilizes a metallic nanostructure to harvest short laser pulse energy and convert it into a highly localized and specifically shaped explosive vapor bubble. Rapid bubble expansion and collapse punctures a lightly-contacting cell membrane via high-speed fluidic flows and induced transient shear stress. The membrane cutting pattern is controlled by the metallic nanostructure configuration, laser pulse polarization, and energy. Highly controllable, sub-micron sized circular hole pairs to half moon-like, or cat-door shaped, membrane cuts were realized in glutaraldehyde treated HeLa cells.

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