Article

Cocaine and Cardiovascular Complications

Department of Cardiology, Chicago Medical School, North Chicago VA Medical Center, North Chicago, IL 60064, USA.
American journal of therapeutics (Impact Factor: 1.13). 12/2010; 18(4):e95-e100. DOI: 10.1097/MJT.0b013e3181ea30eb
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Thirty-six million Americans older than 12 years of age have used cocaine in their lifetime. Cocaine abuse is on the rise and it brings the challenges to treat the complication associated with it, particularly cardiovascular complications. As the understanding of pathophysiology of cocaine-associated cardiovascular complications is advancing, the treatment modalities are also modifying. In this article, common cardiovascular complications associated with acute or chronic cocaine use and their treatment are reviewed.

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