Article

Long-term antibody persistence and immune memory to hepatitis B virus in adult celiac patients vaccinated as adolescents. Vaccine

Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Federico II University of Naples, Italy.
Vaccine (Impact Factor: 3.49). 01/2011; 29(5):1005-8. DOI: 10.1016/j.vaccine.2010.11.060
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Aim of this study was to investigate the anti-HBs antibody persistence and immune memory to hepatitis B virus in adult celiacs vaccinated as adolescents and the effect of a booster administration in non-protected individuals. Eleven years after primary vaccination, the proportion of vaccinees with titres ≥ 10 mIU/ml and antibody geometric mean concentrations (GMCs) were lower among celiac patients than among controls (68.6% vs 91.7%, p<0.01; GMCs 29.38 mIU/ml vs 250.6 mIU/ml, p<0.001). Participants with anti-HBs below 10 mIU/ml received a booster dose and were retested 2 weeks later to assess the anamnestic response. Post-booster anti-HBs levels were still <10 mIU/ml in 71.4% celiacs and 25% controls (p<0.01). Our findings indicate that the prevalence of seroprotective levels of anti-HBs detected eleven years after primary immunization as well as the frequency of response to a booster dose of vaccine are lower in celiac patients compared to healthy controls.

0 Followers
 · 
152 Views
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Patients with celiac disease have an increased risk for severe influenza infection and they show less of a response to certain vaccine types. During the influenza A/H1N1/09 pandemic, we prospectively investigated pandemic vaccine responses in 14 pediatric patients with celiac disease and age-/sex-matched controls. All of the children with celiac disease reached protective antibody titers (≥40) and showed a geometric mean titer comparable with the control group (530 vs 573).
    Journal of pediatric gastroenterology and nutrition 01/2012; 54(6):817-9. DOI:10.1097/MPG.0b013e318248e7be · 2.87 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Patients with celiac disease have an increased risk for severe influenza infection and they show less of a response to certain vaccine types. During the influenza A/H1N1/09 pandemic, we prospectively investigated pan-demic vaccine responses in 14 pediatric patients with celiac disease and age-/sex-matched controls. All of the children with celiac disease reached protective antibody titers (!40) and showed a geometric mean titer com-parable with the control group (530 vs 573).
    Journal of pediatric gastroenterology and nutrition 06/2012; · 2.87 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: To compare intradermal (ID) and intramuscular (IM) booster doses, which have been used in healthy and high risk subjects, such as healthcare workers, haemodialysis patients, human immunodeficiency virus patients, and renal transplant recipients unresponsive to initial hepatitis B vaccination, in celiac individuals. We conducted our study on 58 celiac patients, vaccinated in the first year of life, whose blood analysis had showed the absence of protective hepatitis B virus (HBV) antibodies. All patients had received the last vaccine injection at least one year before study enrolment and they had been on a gluten free diet for at least 1 year. In all patients we randomly performed an HBV vaccine booster dose by ID or IM route. Thirty celiac patients were revaccinated with recombinant hepatitis B vaccine (Engerix B) 2 μg by the ID route, while 28 celiac patients were revaccinated with Engerix B 10 μg by the IM route. Four weeks after every booster dose, the anti-hepatitis B surface (HBs) antibody titer was measured by an enzyme-linked immune-adsorbent assay. We performed a maximum of three booster doses in patients with no anti-HBs antibodies after the first or the second vaccine dose. The cut off value for a negative anti-HBs antibody titer was 10 IU/L. Patients with values between 10 and 100 IU/L were considered "low responders" while patients with an antibody titer higher than 1000 IU/L were considered "high responders". No significant difference in age, gender, duration of illness, and years of gluten intake was found between the two groups. We found a high percentage of "responders" after the first booster dose (ID = 76.7%, IM = 78.6%) and a greater increase after the third dose (ID = 90%, IM = 96.4%) of vaccine in both groups. Moreover we found a significantly higher number of high responders (with an anti-HBs antibody titer > 1000 IU/L) in the ID (40%) than in the IM (7.1%) group, and this difference was evident after the first booster dose of vaccination (P < 0.01). No side effects were recorded in performing delivery of the vaccine by either the ID or IM route. Our study suggests that both ID and IM routes are effective and safe options to administer a booster dose of HBV vaccine in celiac patients. However the ID route seems to achieve a greater number of high responders and to have a better cost/benefit ratio.
    World Journal of Gastroenterology 10/2012; 18(40):5729-33. DOI:10.3748/wjg.v18.i40.5729 · 2.43 Impact Factor
Show more