Article

Increased expression of guanylate binding protein-1 in lesional skin of patients with cutaneous lupus erythematosus.

Division of Molecular and Experimental Surgery, University Medical Center Erlangen, Erlangen, Germany.
Experimental Dermatology (Impact Factor: 3.58). 02/2011; 20(2):102-6. DOI: 10.1111/j.1600-0625.2010.01160.x
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT The large GTPase human guanylate binding protein-1 (GBP-1) is a key mediator of angiostatic effects of inflammation and is induced by interferon (IFN)-α and IFN-γ in endothelial cells (ECs). The aim of this study was to investigate whether GBP-1 is a marker of skin lesions in patients with cutaneous lupus erythematosus (CLE). Western blotting revealed that GBP-1 was in vitro induced by IFN-α and -γ in primary keratinocytes obtained from healthy controls. Moreover, we found that this protein was expressed by keratinocytes and ECs in primary and ultraviolet (UV)-induced skin lesions from patients with various subtypes of CLE, when compared to non-lesional skin. No GBP-1 expression was noted in skin biopsy specimens 24 or 72 h after UV irradiation prior to lesion formation in patients with CLE or in healthy control specimens with or without UV irradiation. Initial findings suggest that GBP-1 is not expressed in other skin diseases with different inflammatory aetiology, such as atopic dermatitis. We conclude that GBP-1 expression is closely associated with skin lesions in patients with CLE, suggesting a contribution of GBP-1 in the pathogenesis of this disease.

0 Bookmarks
 · 
119 Views
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Growing evidence over the last few years suggests a central role of type I IFN pathway in the pathogenesis of systemic autoimmune disorders. Data from clinical and genetic studies in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and lupus-prone mouse models, indicates that the type I interferon system may play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of several lupus and associated clinical features, such as nephritis, neuropsychiatric and cutaneous lupus, premature atherosclerosis as well as lupus-specific autoantibodies particularly against ribonucleoproteins. In the current paper, our aim is to summarize the latest findings supporting the association of type I IFN pathway with specific clinical manifestations in the setting of SLE providing insights on the potential use of type I IFN as a therapeutic target.
    BioMed Research International 01/2011; 2011:273907. · 2.71 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Histiocytic necrotizing lymphadenitis (HNL), also called Kikuchi-Fujimoto disease, is a benign, self-limiting inflammatory disease with fever and painful cervical lymphadenopathy of unknown etiology. A lymph node biopsy is required for the definitive diagnosis because of no specific symptoms or laboratory findings for HNL. To establish the rapid non-invasive diagnostic method for this disease, we investigated genes specifically expressed in the patients by analyzing whole transcriptome using microarray analysis of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). The top five up-regulated genes (IFI44L, CXCL10, GBP1, EPSTI1 and IFI27) in HNL were interferon-induced genes (ISGs). The expression levels of the up-regulated genes by microarray were verified by quantitative PCR. High levels of serum CXCL10 concentration were confirmed at the symptomatic phase of HNL patients. The expression levels of these 5 genes positively correlated with each other (r(2) = 0.28-0.60). The genes were also highly expressed in HNL lymph nodes. The discriminant analysis using the expression levels of these five genes distinguished HNL with 84 % accuracy. The combination of up-regulated ISGs in HNL seemed to be a specific response induced by viral infections or autoantigens. An analysis of the gene expression profile of PBMC may provide a rapid non-invasive diagnosis of HNL.
    Journal of Clinical Immunology 04/2013; · 3.38 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Proinflammatory cytokines induce guanylate-binding protein 1 (GBP-1) protein expression in intestinal epithelial tissues. GBP-1 has been described as influencing a number of cellular processes important for epithelial homeostasis, including cell proliferation. However, many questions remain as to the role of GBP-1 in intestinal mucosal homeostasis. We therefore sought to investigate the function of proinflammatory cytokine-induced GBP-1 during intestinal epithelial cell proliferation. Through the use of complementary GBP-1 overexpression and small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown studies, we now show that GBP-1 acts to inhibit pro-mitogenic β-catenin/T cell factor (TCF) signaling. Interestingly, proinflammatory cytokine-induced GBP-1 was found to be a potent suppressor of β-catenin protein levels and β-catenin serine 552 phosphorylation. Neither glycogen synthase kinase 3β nor proteasomal inhibition alleviated GBP-1-mediated suppression of cell proliferation or β-catenin/TCF signaling, indicating a non-canonical mechanism of β-catenin inhibition. Together, these data show that cytokine-induced GBP-1 retards cell proliferation by forming a negative feedback loop that suppresses β-catenin/TCF signaling.
    Mucosal Immunology 06/2012; 5(6):681-90. · 7.54 Impact Factor

Full-text (2 Sources)

View
28 Downloads
Available from
May 22, 2014