Article

Generation of HIV-1 resistant and functional macrophages from hematopoietic stem cell-derived induced pluripotent stem cells.

Stem Cell Program, Department of Internal Medicine, University of California, Davis, Sacramento, California 95817, USA.
Molecular Therapy (Impact Factor: 6.43). 11/2010; 19(3):584-93. DOI: 10.1038/mt.2010.269
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) have radically advanced the field of regenerative medicine by making possible the production of patient-specific pluripotent stem cells from adult individuals. By developing iPSCs to treat HIV, there is the potential for generating a continuous supply of therapeutic cells for transplantation into HIV-infected patients. In this study, we have used human hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) to generate anti-HIV gene expressing iPSCs for HIV gene therapy. HSCs were dedifferentiated into continuously growing iPSC lines with four reprogramming factors and a combination anti-HIV lentiviral vector containing a CCR5 short hairpin RNA (shRNA) and a human/rhesus chimeric TRIM5α gene. Upon directed differentiation of the anti-HIV iPSCs toward the hematopoietic lineage, a robust quantity of colony-forming CD133(+) HSCs were obtained. These cells were further differentiated into functional end-stage macrophages which displayed a normal phenotypic profile. Upon viral challenge, the anti-HIV iPSC-derived macrophages exhibited strong protection from HIV-1 infection. Here, we demonstrate the ability of iPSCs to develop into HIV-1 resistant immune cells and highlight the potential use of iPSCs for HIV gene and cellular therapies.

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Available from: Jan A Nolta, Mar 24, 2015
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