Article

Sleep problems are of higher priority for improvement for patients with ankylosing spondylitis than for patients with other inflammatory arthropathies

1Department for Research and Development, Oslo University Hospital, Ullevål, Oslo, Norway.
Annals of the rheumatic diseases (Impact Factor: 9.27). 11/2010; 70(5):872-3. DOI: 10.1136/ard.2010.133793
Source: PubMed
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    ABSTRACT: Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a chronic, inflammatory rheumatic disease characterized by the inflammation of the pelvis and spine that results in a restriction in the mobility of the spine. Due to the altered posture and nocturnal inflammatory pain, sleep disturbances are likely to occur in patients with AS.
    Revista Brasileira de Reumatologia 02/2015; 33. DOI:10.1016/j.rbr.2014.12.007 · 0.99 Impact Factor
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    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a chronic, inflammatory rheumatic disease characterized by the inflammation of the pelvis and spine that results in a restriction in the mobility of the spine. Due to the altered posture and nocturnal inflammatory pain, sleep disturbances are likely to occur in patients with AS.
    Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases 03/2015; 33(Suppl 3). DOI:10.1016/j.rbre.2014.12.007 · 9.27 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Sleep problems are common in persons living with spondyloathropathy (SpA). Approximately 55%Á66% of individuals living with SpA report poor sleep quality, characterized mainly by difficulties initiating and/or maintaining sleep. Emerging data also indicate that sleep and respiratory disorders are prevalent in patients with SpA. Despite their prevalence and potential to negatively impact health and quality of life, sleep problems remain underrecognized, undertreated, and understudied in this patient population. Only a handful of studies have been conducted to investigate determinants of sleep problems in SpA. The findings suggest that disease expression (activity, pain) and psychosocial factors, including depressed mood and stress contribute to sleep problems in SpA. Future studies, integrating a biopsychosocial approach, are needed to clarify the specific factors and underlying mechanisms that trigger and maintain sleep problems in SpA. The course of sleep problems in SpA remains unknown as studies have been cross sectional. Directions for future research are discussed herein. Routine assessment and management of sleep problems in SpA should be part of the comprehensive care of patients with SpA. While effective pharmacological and nonpharmacological treatments are available to manage sleep problems, few studies have specifically evaluated these strategies for persons living with SpA. Given the complex interplay of factors contributing to sleep problems in SpA, a multimodal treatment approach combining nonpharmacological strategies and medication for more chronic and difficult cases should be utilized for the management of sleep difficulties in SpA.