Article

SPIKE1 signals originate from and assemble specialized domains of the endoplasmic reticulum.

Department of Agronomy, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907-2054, USA.
Current biology: CB (Impact Factor: 10.99). 12/2010; 20(23):2144-9. DOI: 10.1016/j.cub.2010.11.016
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT In the leaf epidermis, intricately lobed pavement cells use Rho of plants (ROP) small GTPases to integrate actin and microtubule organization with trafficking through the secretory pathway. Cell signaling occurs because guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) promote ROP activation and their interactions with effector proteins that direct the cell growth machineries. In Arabidopsis, SPIKE1 (SPK1) is the lone DOCK family GEF. SPK1 promotes polarized growth and cell-cell adhesion in the leaf epidermis; however, its mode of action in cells is not known. Vertebrate DOCK proteins are deployed at the plasma membrane. Likewise, current models place SPK1 activity and/or active ROP at the plant plasma membrane and invoke the localized patterning of the cortical cytoskeleton as the mechanism for shape control. In this paper, we find that SPK1 is a peripheral membrane protein that accumulates at, and promotes the formation of, a specialized domain of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) termed the ER exit site (ERES). SPK1 signals are generated from a distributed network of ERES point sources and maintain the homeostasis of the early secretory pathway. The ERES is the location for cargo export from the ER. Our findings open up unexpected areas of plant G protein biology and redefine the ERES as a subcellular location for signal integration during morphogenesis.

0 Bookmarks
 · 
133 Views
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Plant vacuoles are essential organelles for plant growth and development, and have multiple functions. Vacuoles are highly dynamic and pleiomorphic, and their size varies depending on the cell type and growth conditions. Vacuoles compartmentalize different cellular components such as proteins, sugars, ions and other secondary metabolites and play critical roles in plants response to different biotic/abiotic signaling pathways. In this review, we will summarize the patterns of changes in vacuole morphology in certain cell types, our understanding of the mechanisms of plant vacuole biogenesis, and the role of SNAREs and Rab GTPases in vacuolar trafficking.
    Frontiers in Plant Science 09/2014; 5:476. · 3.64 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Background: A molecular-level understanding of the loss of CURVY1 (CVY1) gene expression (which encodes a member of the receptor-like protein kinase family) was investigated to gain insights into the mechanisms controlling cell morphogenesis and development in Arabidopsis thaliana.
    BMC Plant Biology 08/2014; 14:221. · 3.94 Impact Factor
  • Source
    Article: The.
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: BackgroundA molecular-level understanding of the loss of CURVY1 (CVY1) gene expression (which encodes a member of the receptor-like protein kinase family) was investigated to gain insights into the mechanisms controlling cell morphogenesis and development in Arabidopsis thaliana.ResultsUsing a reverse genetic and cell biology approaches, we demonstrate that CVY1 is a new DISTORTED gene with similar phenotypic characterization to previously characterized ARP2/3 distorted mutants. Compared to the wild type, cvy1 mutant displayed a strong distorted trichome and altered pavement cell phenotypes. In addition, cvy1 null-mutant flowers earlier, grows faster and produces more siliques than WT and the arp2/3 mutants. The CVY1 gene is ubiquitously expressed in all tissues and seems to negatively regulate growth and yield in higher plants.Conclusions Our results suggest that CURVY1 gene participates in several biochemical pathways in Arabidopsis thaliana including (i) cell morphogenesis regulation through actin cytoskeleton functional networks, (ii) the transition of vegetative to the reproductive stage and (iii) the production of seeds.
    BMC Plant Biology 08/2014; 14(1):221. · 3.94 Impact Factor

Full-text

Download
76 Downloads
Available from
May 27, 2014