Article

Neuropsychological Profile of Parkin Mutation Carriers with and without Parkinson Disease: The CORE-PD Study.

Department of Neurology, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, New York, USA.
Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society (Impact Factor: 3.01). 01/2011; 17(1):91-100. DOI: 10.1017/S1355617710001190
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT The cognitive profile of early onset Parkinson's disease (EOPD) has not been clearly defined. Mutations in the parkin gene are the most common genetic risk factor for EOPD and may offer information about the neuropsychological pattern of performance in both symptomatic and asymptomatic mutation carriers. EOPD probands and their first-degree relatives who did not have Parkinson's disease (PD) were genotyped for mutations in the parkin gene and administered a comprehensive neuropsychological battery. Performance was compared between EOPD probands with (N = 43) and without (N = 52) parkin mutations. The same neuropsychological battery was administered to 217 first-degree relatives to assess neuropsychological function in individuals who carry parkin mutations but do not have PD. No significant differences in neuropsychological test performance were found between parkin carrier and noncarrier probands. Performance also did not differ between EOPD noncarriers and carrier subgroups (i.e., heterozygotes, compound heterozygotes/homozygotes). Similarly, no differences were found among unaffected family members across genotypes. Mean neuropsychological test performance was within normal range in all probands and relatives. Carriers of parkin mutations, whether or not they have PD, do not perform differently on neuropsychological measures as compared to noncarriers. The cognitive functioning of parkin carriers over time warrants further study.

2 Followers
 · 
196 Views
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Parkinson's disease is associated with multiple cognitive impairments and increased risk of dementia, but the extent of these deficits varies widely among patients. The ICICLE-PD study was established to define the characteristics and prevalence of cognitive change soon after diagnosis, in a representative cohort of patients, using a multimodal approach. Specifically, we tested the 'Dual Syndrome' hypothesis for cognitive impairment in Parkinson's disease, which distinguishes an executive syndrome (affecting the frontostriatal regions due to dopaminergic deficits) from a posterior cortical syndrome (affecting visuospatial, mnemonic and semantic functions related to Lewy body pathology and secondary cholinergic loss). An incident Parkinson's disease cohort (n = 168, median 8 months from diagnosis to participation) and matched control group (n = 85) were recruited to a neuroimaging study at two sites in the UK. All participants underwent clinical, neuropsychological and functional magnetic resonance imaging assessments. The three neuroimaging tasks (Tower of London, Spatial Rotations and Memory Encoding Tasks) were designed to probe executive, visuospatial and memory encoding domains, respectively. Patients were also genotyped for three polymorphisms associated with cognitive change in Parkinson's disease and related disorders: (i) rs4680 for COMT Val158Met polymorphism; (ii) rs9468 for MAPT H1 versus H2 haplotype; and (iii) rs429358 for APOE-epsilon2, 3, 4. We identified performance deficits in all three cognitive domains, which were associated with regionally specific changes in cortical activation. Task-specific regional activations in Parkinson's disease were linked with genetic variation: the rs4680 polymorphism modulated the effect of levodopa therapy on planning-related activations in the frontoparietal network; the MAPT haplotype modulated parietal activations associated with spatial rotations; and APOE allelic variation influenced the magnitude of activation associated with memory encoding. This study demonstrates that neurocognitive deficits are common even in recently diagnosed patients with Parkinson's disease, and that the associated regional brain activations are influenced by genotype. These data further support the dual syndrome hypothesis of cognitive change in Parkinson's disease. Longitudinal data will confirm the extent to which these early neurocognitive changes, and their genetic factors, influence the long-term risk of dementia in Parkinson's disease. The combination of genetics and functional neuroimaging provides a potentially useful method for stratification and identification of candidate markers, in future clinical trials against cognitive decline in Parkinson's disease.
    Brain 09/2014; 137. DOI:10.1093/brain/awu201 · 10.23 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The recent formalization of clinical criteria for Parkinson's disease with dementia (PDD) codifies many studies on this topic, including those assessing biological correlates. These studies show that the emergence of PDD occurs on the background of severe dopamine deficits with, the main pathological drivers of cognitive decline being a synergistic effect between alpha-synuclein and Alzheimer's disease pathology. The presence of these pathologies correlates with a marked loss of limbic and cortically projecting dopamine, noradrenaline, serotonin, and acetylcholine neurons, although the exact timing of these relationships remains to be determined. Genetic factors, such as triplications in the α-synuclein gene, lead to a clear increased risk of PDD, whereas others, such as parkin mutations, are associated with a reduced risk of PDD. The very recent formalization of clinical criteria for PD with mild cognitive impairment (PD-MCI) allows only speculation on its biological and genetic bases. Critical assessment of animal models shows that chronic low-dose MPTP treatment in primates recapitulates PD-MCI over time, enhancing the current biological concept of PD-MCI as having enhanced dopamine deficiency in frontostriatal pathways as well as involvement of other neurotransmitter systems. Data from other animal models support multiple transmitter involvement in cognitive impairment in PD. Whereas dopamine dysfunction has been highlighted because of its obvious role in PD, the role of the other neurotransmitter systems, neurodegenerative pathologies, and genetic factors in PD-MCI remains to be fully elucidated. © 2014 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society
    Movement Disorders 04/2014; 29(5). DOI:10.1002/mds.25857 · 5.63 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Ashkenazi Jewish (AJ) LRRK2 carriers are more likely to manifest the postural instability gait difficulty (PIGD) motor phenotype than non-carriers but perform similarly to non-carriers on cognitive screening tests.Objective To compare the cognitive profiles of AJ with Parkinson’s disease (PD) with and without LRRK2 G2019S mutations using a comprehensive neuropsychological battery.Methods We administered a neuropsychological battery to PD participants in the Michael J. Fox Foundation AJ consortium. Participants (n=236) from Beth Israel Medical Center, NY, Columbia University Medical Center, NY and Tel Aviv Medical Center, Israel included 116 LRRK2 G2019S carriers and 120 non-carriers. Glucocerbrosidase mutation carriers were excluded. We compared performance on each neuropsychological test between carriers and non-carriers. Participants in New York (n=112) were evaluated with the entire battery. Tel Aviv participants (n=124) were evaluated on attention, executive function and psychomotor speed tasks. The association between G2019S mutation status (predictor) and each neuropsychological test (outcome) was assessed using linear regression models adjusted for PIGD motor phenotype, site, sex, age, disease duration, education, Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) Part III, levodopa equivalent dose, and Geriatric Depression Score (GDS).ResultsCarriers had longer disease duration (p<0.001) and were more likely to manifest the PIGD phenotype (p=0.024). In adjusted regression models, carriers performed better than non-carriers in Stroop Word Reading (p<0.001), Stroop Interference (p=0.011) and Category Fluency (p=0.026).Conclusion In AJ-PD, G2019S mutation status is associated with better attention (Stroop Word Reading), executive function (Stroop Interference) and language (Category Fluency) after adjustment for PIGD motor phenotype.
    Parkinsonism & Related Disorders 11/2014; 21(2). DOI:10.1016/j.parkreldis.2014.09.033 · 4.13 Impact Factor

Full-text (2 Sources)

Download
34 Downloads
Available from
Jun 3, 2014