Article

A comprehensive meta-analysis of the risk of suicide in eating disorders

Centro Medico Genneruxi, Via Costantinopoli 42, Cagliari, Italy.
Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica (Impact Factor: 5.55). 11/2010; 124(1):6-17. DOI: 10.1111/j.1600-0447.2010.01641.x
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Past meta-analyses on suicide in eating disorders included few available studies.
PubMed/Medline search for papers including sample n ≥40 and follow-up ≥5 years: 40 studies on anorexia nervosa (AN), 16 studies on bulimia nervosa (BN), and three studies on binge eating disorder (BED) were included.
Of 16,342 patients with AN, 245 suicides occurred over a mean follow-up of 11.1 years (suicide rate=0.124 per 100 person-years). Standardized mortality ratio (SMR) was 31.0 (Poisson 95% CI=21.0-44.0); a clear decrease in suicide risk over time was observed in recent decades. Of 1768 patients with BN, four suicides occurred over a mean follow-up of 7.5 years (suicide rate=0.030 per 100 person-years): SMR was 7.5 (1.6-11.6). No suicide occurred among 246 patients with BED (mean follow-up=5.3 years).
AN and BN share many risk factors for suicide: the factors causing lower suicide rates per person-year in BN compared to AN should be investigated.

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