Article

National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey: 2007 summary.

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics, Division of Health Care Statistics, Hyattsville, MD 20782, USA.
National health statistics reports 11/2010;
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT This report describes ambulatory care visits made to physician offices in the United States. Statistics are presented on selected characteristics of the physician's practice, the patient, and the visit.
The data presented in this report were collected in the 2007 National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NAMCS), a national probability sample survey of visits to nonfederal office-based physicians in the United States. Sample data are weighted to produce annual national estimates of physician visits.
During 2007, an estimated 994.3 million visits were made to physician offices in the United States, an overall rate of 335.6 visits per 100 persons. About one-third of office visits, 34.9 percent, were made to practices with all or partial electronic medical records systems, while 85.1 percent of the visits were made to practices with all or partial electronic submission of claims. From 1997 to 2007, the percentage of visits to physicians who were solo practitioners decreased 21 percent. During the same period, visits to physicians who were part of a group practice with 6-10 physicians increased 46 percent. There were an estimated 106.5 million injury- or poisoning-related office visits in 2007, representing 10.7 percent of all visits. Medications were ordered, supplied, or administered at 727.7 million office visits, accounting for 73.2 percent of all office visits. In 2007, about 2.3 billion drugs were ordered, supplied, or administered, resulting in an average of 226.3 drug mentions per 100 visits.

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