Article

Reproduction in Camel

Veterinary World 01/2009;
Source: DOAJ

ABSTRACT The word camel is derived from the Greek word “kremal”. Camel is an important component of the desert ecosystem from time immemorial and is recognized as the “Ship of the desert”. Humans depend on this animal not just for meat, milk and hide but also as one of the most important mode of transport in the desert which has increased to 10,30,000 million according to FAO census, which is almost 6-8% of the total camel population of the world. The genus Camelus has two species, one humped camel found in Africa, Arabia, Iran, Afghanistan and India and two-humped camel found in Central Asia reaching up to Mongolia and Western part of China. Camels have 70 chromosomes. Camels do not have sweat glands and can tolerate heat up to 49 oC to 50oC during the day time and 30oC during night time. [Vet. World 2009; 2(2.000): 72-73]

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    ABSTRACT: The present study was aimed to investigate the effect of breeding and non-breeding seasons either hot-humid or hot-dry months on thermoregulation parameters, blood haematology and blood serum components of 65 clinically healthy male dromedary camels. The obtained results showed that, rectal temperature, respiration rate and pulse rate were significantly (P<0.05) higher during non-breeding season in hot-humid months than hot-dry months and breeding season. Haemoglobin and haematocrit red blood cells were significantly (P<0.05) higher during non-breeding season either hot-humid or hot-dry months than breeding season. While, white blood cells count was significantly (P<0.05) lower during non-breeding season in hot-humid months than hot-dry months and breeding season. Total protein concentration was significantly (P<0.05) increased, while albumin and globulin concentrations were insignificantly increased in the non-breeding season in hot-humid months as compared with hot-dry months and breeding season. Sodium concentration and activities of alkaline phosphatase, alanine-aminotransferase and aspartate-aminotransferase enzymes were significantly (P<0.05) higher during non-breeding season in hot-humid months as compared with hot-dry months and breeding season. Potassium concentration was significantly (P<0.05) higher during breeding and non-breeding seasons in hot-dry months than in hot-humid months. Cholesterol, calcium, total phosphorus and testosterone hormone concentrations were significantly (P<0.05) higher during breeding season than the non-breeding season in hot-dry and hot-humid months.

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