Article

Music Intelligence and Music Theory Learning: A Cognitive Load Theory Viewpoint

International Journal of Psychological Studies 01/2010;
Source: DOAJ

ABSTRACT The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of cognitive load theory and the role of music intelligenceon the learning of music theory among Jordanian primary pupils. The independent variable was music intelligencelevels (high, low). The dependent variables were the post test score. An analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) wascarried out to examine the main effects of the independent variables on the dependent variables. The findings ofthis study showed that pupils with high music intelligence pupils performed significantly better than low musicintelligence pupils.

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