Article

Additional sources of bias in half-life estimation

Department of Management and Operations, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164, USA; Department of Economics, Mail Code 4515, Southern Illinois University, Carbondale, IL 62901, USA; Received 13 September 2005. Revised 18 December 2005. Accepted 20 December 2005. Available online 10 January 2006.
Computational Statistics & Data Analysis (Impact Factor: 1.3). 01/2006; 51(3):2056-2064. DOI: 10.1016/j.csda.2005.12.016
Source: RePEc

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