Article

Viral serine/threonine protein kinases.

Department of Virology, Parasitology, and Immunology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Ghent University, Salisburylaan 133, 9820 Merelbeke, Belgium.
Journal of Virology (Impact Factor: 4.65). 11/2010; 85(3):1158-73. DOI: 10.1128/JVI.01369-10
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Phosphorylation represents one the most abundant and important posttranslational modifications of proteins, including viral proteins. Virus-encoded serine/threonine protein kinases appear to be a feature that is unique to large DNA viruses. Although the importance of these kinases for virus replication in cell culture is variable, they invariably play important roles in virus virulence. The current review provides an overview of the different viral serine/threonine protein kinases of several large DNA viruses and discusses their function, importance, and potential as antiviral drug targets.

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