Article

Reactome knowledgebase of human biological pathways and processes.

Department of Biochemistry, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY, USA.
Methods in molecular biology (Clifton, N.J.) (Impact Factor: 1.29). 01/2011; 694:49-61. DOI: 10.1007/978-1-60761-977-2_4
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT The Reactome Knowledgebase is an online, manually curated resource that provides an integrated view of the molecular details of human biological processes that range from metabolism to DNA replication and repair to signaling cascades. Its data model allows these diverse processes to be represented in a consistent way to facilitate usage as online text and as a resource for data mining, modeling, and analysis of large-scale expression data sets over the full range of human biological processes.

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