Article

The association between low-socioeconomic status mother's Sense of Coherence and their child's utilization of dental care

National School of Public Health, Oswaldo Cruz Foundation (ENSP/FIOCRUZ), Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.
Community Dentistry And Oral Epidemiology (Impact Factor: 1.94). 10/2010; 39(2):115-26. DOI: 10.1111/j.1600-0528.2010.00576.x
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT The objective of this study was to investigate the relationship of low-socioeconomic status mother's Sense of Coherence (SOC) and their child's utilization of dental care services in a city of Southeast Brazil.
A cross-sectional study was conducted on a sample of 190 schoolchildren aged 11-12 and their mothers in Sao João de Meriti-RJ, Southeast Brazil. The outcome variables were children's use of dental care services and visiting dentists mainly for check-ups. Demographic and socioeconomic characteristics and data regarding children's dental care use were collected through interviews with mothers. Children's oral health-related behaviours as well as dental status (DMFS index), dental pain, Visible Dental Plaque and Bleeding on Probing Index were registered. Mother's SOC was assessed through the validated short version (13-item) of Antonovsky's scale. Multiple logistic regression was used in the data analysis.
Of the mothers, 81.1% reported on their child's utilization of dental care services. Of them, 42.9% considered check-ups as the main reason for taking their children to dental services. Children whose mothers had higher levels of SOC were more likely to utilize dental care services (OR=2.08 95%CI=1.17-3.64) and visit a dentist mainly for check-ups (except for dental treatment) (OR=2.02 95%CI=1.06-3.81) than those whose mothers had lower levels of SOC. These findings were adjusted for socioeconomic status, children's oral health-related behaviours and oral health measures.
Mother's SOC was a psychosocial factor associated with their child's pattern of use of dental care services in low-socioeconomic status families.

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Available from: Mario Vianna Vettore, Jan 15, 2014
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    • "It has been confirmed that caregivers influence their children’s oral health and oral health-related behaviors, mainly through their own oral health-related behaviors, knowledge, and attitudes [15,16]. Recently, the mother’s SOC has been shown to be an important psychological factor associated with children’s oral health and oral health-related behaviors [17,18]. A study by Freire et al. found that adolescents whose mothers had higher level of SOC score had lower level of dental caries and gingival bleeding after probing, and were less likely to visit a dentist mainly only when in trouble, than those whose mothers had lower level of SOC [17]. "
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    ABSTRACT: Background Sense of coherence (SOC) is hypothesized to be an important psychological factor that enables people to cope with stressors and successfully maintain and improve health. Mother’s SOC has been shown to be an important psychological factor associated with oral health and oral health-related behaviors of adolescents and 11- to 12-year-old children. However, little is known about the relationship between the caregiver’s SOC and oral health-related behaviors of the preschool children. The objective of this study was to investigate the relationship between oral health-related behaviors of 5-year-old children in Southern China and SOC of their caregiver. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted in a randomized sample of 1332 children aged 5 years and their caregivers in Guangzhou, Southern China. Data were collected through questionnaires completed by the caregivers. The Chinese short version of Antonovsky’s SOC scale (13 items) was employed to assess the caregiver’s SOC. The outcome variables were the child’s oral health-related behaviors, including frequency of sugary snack intake, toothbrushing frequency, utilization of dental service, and pattern of dental visits. Multiple logistic regression was used to analyze the relationship between the variables. Results No association was found between the children’s sugary snack intake and the mother’s or the father’s SOC. After adjustment for other significant factors related to the child’s oral health-related behaviors, 8.9% of the children whose grandparents (as caregivers) had higher SOC scores had a lower frequency of sugary snack intake, compared with the children whose grandparents had lower SOC scores (OR = 0.61, 95% CI = 0.50–0.73, p = 0.008). The other measures of oral health-related behaviors of the child were not significantly associated with the caregiver’s SOC. Conclusion Sugary snack intake behavior of the 5-year-old children was not associated with the mother’s or the father’s SOC. It was associated with the SOC of their grandparents, who are a small group of the caregivers in China.
    BMC Public Health 03/2013; 13(1):239. DOI:10.1186/1471-2458-13-239 · 2.32 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This study sought to advance understanding of the influence of psychosocial factors on oral health by examining how parental self-efficacy (with regard to acting on their child's oral health needs) and oral health knowledge relate to parental and child oral health behaviors and self-rated oral health. Parents of children in grades 0/1 and 5/6 (n = 804) and children in grades 5/6 (n = 377, mean age 11.5 ± 1.0, 53.9% female) were recruited from a stratified random sample of 11 primary (elementary) schools. Participants completed surveys capturing psychosocial factors, oral health-related knowledge, and parental attitudes about oral health. Parents also rated their own oral health status and the oral health of their child. Correlations and logistic regression analysis (adjusted for socioeconomic status, child age, and gender) examined associations between psychosocial factors and the outcomes of interest (parent and child behaviors and self-rated oral health status). Higher parental self-efficacy was associated with more frequent toothbrushing (by parent and child), and more frequent visits to a dental professional. These associations were particularly strong with regard to dental visits for children, with parents with the highest tertile for self-efficacy 4.3 times more likely to report that their child attended a dentist for a checkup at least once a year (95%CI 2.52–7.43); and 3 times more likely to report their child brushing their teeth at least twice a day (Adjusted Odds Ratio 3.04, 95%CI 1.64–5.64) compared with those parents in the lowest tertile for self-efficacy. No associations with oral health knowledge were found when examined by tertile of increasing knowledge. Oral health self-efficacy and knowledge are potentially modifiable risk factors of oral health outcomes, and these findings suggest that intervening on these factors could help foster positive dental health habits in families.
    Community Dentistry And Oral Epidemiology 11/2012; 41(4). DOI:10.1111/cdoe.12019 · 1.94 Impact Factor
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