Article

Special Report-Pediatric Advanced Life Support: 2010 American Heart Association Guidelines for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Emergency Cardiovascular Care

PEDIATRICS (Impact Factor: 5.3). 10/2010; 126(5):e1361-99. DOI: 10.1542/peds.2010-2972D
Source: PubMed
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