Article

Illustrating the Impact of a Time-Varying Covariate With an Extended Kaplan-Meier Estimator

The American Statistician (Impact Factor: 0.98). 02/2005; 59(November):301-307. DOI: 10.1198/000313005X70371
Source: RePEc
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