Article

Symptom patterns in dissociative identity disorder patients and the general population.

The Colin A. Ross Institute for Psychological Trauma, Richardson, Texas 75080, USA.
Journal of Trauma & Dissociation (Impact Factor: 1.72). 10/2010; 11(4):458-68. DOI: 10.1080/15299732.2010.495939
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT The authors used the Dissociative Disorders Interview Schedule to compare structured interview symptom patterns in a general population sample (N= 502) and a sample of patients with clinical diagnoses of dissociative identity disorder (N= 303). Based on the Trauma Model, the authors predicted that the patterns would be similar in the 2 samples and that symptom scores would be higher in participants reporting childhood sexual abuse in both samples. They predicted that symptom scores would be higher among women with dissociative identity disorder reporting sexual abuse than among women in the general population reporting sexual abuse, with the clinical sample reporting more severe abuse. These predictions were supported by the data. The authors conclude that symptom patterns in dissociative identity disorder are typical of the normal human response to severe, chronic childhood trauma and have ecological validity for the human race in general.

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