Hepatitis C prevalence among HIV-positive MSM in San Francisco: 2004 and 2008

San Francisco Department of Public Health, San Francisco, CA
Sexually transmitted diseases (Impact Factor: 2.84). 10/2010; 38(3):219-20. DOI: 10.1097/OLQ.0b013e3181f68ed4
Source: PubMed


Recent reports suggest the potential for an epidemic of Hepatitis C among nonintravenous drug-using HIV-positive men who have sex with men. HIV-positive specimens from surveillance surveys in 2004 and 2008 were tested for HCV antibodies. Among noninjection drug using men who have sex with men, HCV prevalence was 8.7% and 4.5% in 2004 and 2008, respectively. There was no evidence of a change in HCV prevalence between 2004 and 2008.

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