Article

XMRV Prevalence in Patients with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome or Chronic Immunomodulatory Conditions

Division of Infectious Diseases, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.
The Journal of Infectious Diseases (Impact Factor: 5.78). 10/2010; 202(10):1478-81. DOI: 10.1086/657168
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT We investigated the prevalence of xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV) among 293 participants seen at academic hospitals in Boston, Massachusetts. Participants were recruited from the following 5 groups of patients: chronic fatigue syndrome (n = 32), human immunodeficiency virus infection (n = 43), rheumatoid arthritis (n = 97), hematopoietic stem-cell or solid organ transplant (n = 26), or a general cohort of patients presenting for medical care (n = 95). XMRV DNA was not detected in any participant samples. We found no association between XMRV and patients with chronic fatigue syndrome or chronic immunomodulatory conditions.

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