Article

Peering into the aftermath: The inhospitable host?

Sunnybrook Research Institute, Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Canada.
Nature medicine (Impact Factor: 28.05). 10/2010; 16(10):1084-5. DOI: 10.1038/nm1010-1084
Source: PubMed

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Available from: John Ebos, Oct 18, 2014
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