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Toward New Approaches to Psychotic Disorders: The NIMH Research Domain Criteria Project

National Institute of Mental Health, 6001 Executive Boulevard, MSC 9625, Bethesda, MD 20892.
Schizophrenia Bulletin (Impact Factor: 8.61). 10/2010; 36(6):1061-2. DOI: 10.1093/schbul/sbq108
Source: PubMed
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